ME52A:
Biologging Ecology and Oceanography: Integrative Approaches to Animal-Borne Observations in a Changing Ocean I

Session ID#: 93055

Session Description:
Animal-borne tags are increasingly capable of measuring oceanographic conditions as well as animal behaviors and vital rates in situ. These biologging sensors are particularly valuable for the study of marine animals where direct behavioral observation is often impossible. Understanding behavioral patterns and vital rates are long-standing research objectives because they can inform an array of critical biological and ecological questions such as estimated energy budgets and energetic costs of certain behaviors. Such data is particularly important as animals increasingly face a changing environment. Additionally, the identification of occurrence rate, timing, and locations of critical behavioral states (e.g., reproductive activity or movement patterns) and community interactions (e.g., predator-prey) are crucial for proper species management. As such, biologging tools can support informed management of ecosystems and their resources, and is particularly valuable for commercial, recreational, or culturally important species. New tool and sensor advances are allowing us to study animal-bourne oceanography and habitats with increasing resolution, from new perspectives and on more taxa than ever before. We invite presentations that include all aspects of biologging science including oceanographic observations, behavioral ecology, physiology and tool development. We particularly encourage new and innovative research approaches, insights and integrative science.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  T Aran Mooney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Co-chairs:  Kenneth Alex Shorter, University of Michigan, Mechanical Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI, United States and Amy Kukulya, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Lauran Brewster, Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Inst., Fort Pierce, FL, United States
Moderators:  T Aran Mooney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Lauran Brewster, Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Inst., Fort Pierce, FL, United States and Amy Kukulya, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Kenneth Alex Shorter, University of Michigan, Mechanical Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Connecting the Dots: Refining Irregular Blacktip Shark Movement Data (658301)
Beth Bowers, Florida Atlantic University, Integrative Biology, Boca Raton, FL, United States and Stephen Kajiura, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, United States
Advancing Understanding of Goliath Grouper Behavioral Ecology (645854)
Lauran Brewster1, Matthew Joseph Ajemian2, Breanna Degroot2, Michael McCallister3, James Locascio4 and Laurent M Cherubin2, (1)Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Inst., Fort Pierce, FL, United States, (2)Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, FL, United States, (3)Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, United States, (4)Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, FL, United States
An At-Sea Assessment of Argos Location Accuracy for Three Species of Large Whales: Deep-Diving Behavior Increases Location Error (654533)
Daniel M Palacios, Ladd M Irvine, Martha Winsor, Tomas Follett and Bruce R Mate, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Development and testing of vibration-sensing tags for assessing fish and invertebrate vocalizations (642043)
Frants Jensen, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, David Mann, Loggerhead Instruments, Sarasota, FL, United States, Aaron N. Rice, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Bioacoustics Research Program, Ithaca, NY, United States and T. Aran Mooney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, United States
Diel Vertical Migrations and Climb-and-Glide Ascents in Veined Squid (Loligo forbesi)' (652977)
Seth Cones1, Kakani Katija2, K. Alex Shorter3, Frants Jensen1, David Mann4, Pedro Afonso5, Jorge Fontes6, Aleck Zhaohui Wang7 and T. Aran Mooney8, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (3)University of Michigan, Mechanical Engineering, MI, United States, (4)Loggerhead Instruments, Sarasota, FL, United States, (5)Institute for Marine Research, University of the Azores, Portugal, (6)Institute of Marine Research, University of the Azores, Oceangraphy and Fisheries, Portugal, (7)Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (8)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, United States
Let’s get it together: Using Darwin Core to standardize bio-logging data (641033)
Abigail Benson, USGS Central Region Offices Denver, Denver, CO, United States, Sarah Cain Davidson, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Migration, Radolfzell, Germany, Peter Desmet, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium, Holger Dettki, SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden, Peggy Newman, Atlas of Living Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia and Jon Pye, Ocean Tracking Network, Halifax, NS, Canada
Movements of Reef Manta Rays in a Large Marine Protected Area at Multiple Spatio-Temporal Scales (649598)
Samantha Andrzejaczek1, Taylor Chapple1, David Curnick2, Aaron B Carlisle1, Michael Castleton1, David Jacoby2, Robert Schallert1, David Tickler3 and Barbara Block1, (1)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (2)Zoological Society of London, Institute of Zoology, London, United Kingdom, (3)The University of Western Australia, Marine Futures Lab, Crawley, WA, Australia
New Insights into Blue, Fin, and Humpback Whale Feeding, Movements, and Impacts of Human Activities from Medium-duration Archival Tags (656865)
John Calambokidis1, James Fahlbusch1, Angela R Szesciorka2,3, Ana Sirovic2, Brandon Southall4, David Cade5, Ari S Friedlaender6, William Oestreich5 and Jeremy A Goldbogen7, (1)Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States, (2)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Southall Environmental Associates, Inc., CA, United States, (5)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (6)University of California Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Science, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (7)Hopkins Marine Station/ Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States
The Scale of the Whale: Using Video-tag Data to Determine Sea Ice Utilization of Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera Bonaerensis) (641994)
Jacob Linsky, United States, Nicole Wilson, University of California Santa Cruz, United States, David Cade, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, Jeremy A Goldbogen, Hopkins Marine Station/ Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, David William Johnston, Duke University, Duke University Marine Lab, Durham, NC, United States and Ari S Friedlaender, University of California Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Science, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Using Remotely Transmitted Accelerometer Data Collected from Pop-Up Satellite Archival Tags to Predict Spawning in Wild Mahi-Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) (647093)
Lela Schlenker1, John Stieglitz1, Robin Faillettaz1, Chi Hin Lam2, Georgina Cox1, Rachael Heuer1, Christina Pasparakis1, Ronald Hoenig1, Elizabeth Babcock1, Daniel Benetti1, Claire B B Paris1 and Martin Grosell1, (1)University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, (2)Large Pelagics Research Center/University of Massachusetts, Boston, United States