ME51A:
Exploring and Characterizing Deep- and Coastal Ocean Soundscapes I

Session ID#: 93060

Session Description:
The ocean is vast, sparsely charted, deep, and underexplored. The physical properties of the ocean enable sound waves to propagate and be detected over very long, at times even ocean basin-scale distances, and thus sound can be a powerful tool to detect and observe deep-ocean processes. For example, major storm events can significantly raise ambient sound levels in the deep ocean. Many marine animals, from shrimp to whales, use sound to communicate and assess their environment. The combination of biological, geological, physical, and anthropogenic sounds together make up the marine “soundscape”. Exploring marine soundscapes can lead to a better understanding of the ocean and characterization of these marine environments, as well as providing a measurement of current sound levels to compare against predicted future increases in anthropogenic sound sources. Further, ocean sound was recently identified as an essential ocean variable by the Global Ocean Observing System. This session aims to explore the holistic use of sound to characterize deep and coastal ocean areas, as well as discuss potential gaps in current understanding, and new ways to interpret and quantify ocean soundscapes.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4259 Ocean acoustics [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
Primary Chair:  Adrienne Copeland, NOAA Ocean Exploration, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Co-chairs:  Robert P Dziak, NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Newport, United States, Ana Sirovic, Texas A&M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX, United States and Delwayne R Bohnenstiehl, North Carolina State Univ., Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Raleigh, NC, United States
Primary Liaison:  Adrienne Copeland, NOAA Ocean Exploration, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Moderators:  Adrienne Copeland, NOAA Ocean Exploration, Silver Spring, MD, United States and Robert P Dziak, NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Newport, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Adrienne Copeland, NOAA Ocean Exploration, Silver Spring, MD, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Joint Monitoring Programme for Ambient Noise in the North Sea (645280)
Niels Kinneging, Rijkswaterstaat, Utrecht, Netherlands, Mathias Andersson, FOI, Stockholm, Sweden, Stephen Robinson, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, United Kingdom, Christ DeJong, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, The Hague, Netherlands, Jens Fischer, BSH Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency, Hamburg, Germany, Nathan D Merchant, Center for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft, United Kingdom and Jakob Tougaard, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark
Contributors to the Arctic Acoustic Environment: Describing the Puzzle Pieces (649074)
Manuel Castellote1, Catherine Berchok2, Dimitri W Ponirakis3, Arial Brewer4, Yu Shiu5, Christopher W Clark5, Jessica M Kimber4 and Daniel Forrest Woodrich6, (1)NOAA Fisheries & U. of Washington - JISAO, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center - MML, WA, United States, (3)Cornell Lab or Ornithology, United States, (4)NOAA Fisheries & U. of Washington - JISAO, United States, (5)Cornell Lab of Ornithology, United States, (6)NOAA Fisheries & Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, United States
Gulf of Mexico Stones deep water ocean soundscape project: the first passive acoustic deployment of the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. (639850)
Cynthia Pyc1, Katie A Kowarski2, Emily E Maxner2, Craig R McPherson3 and Julien Delarue4, (1)JASCO Applied Sciences (USA) Inc., Victoria, BC, Canada, (2)JASCO Applied Sciences (Canada) Ltd, Dartmouth, NS, Canada, (3)JASCO Applied Sciences (Australia) Pty Ltd, Capalaba, QLD, Australia, (4)JASCO Applied Sciences (Canada) Ltd., Dartmouth, NS, Canada
Acoustic indices' 3D maps of benthic biophony reflect the health status of coral reefs: demonstration in the Philippines through a coupling with photogrammetry (649637)
Frédéric Tradieu1, Julie Lossent2, Cedric Gervaise2, Florian Holon3, Julie Deter3, Thomas Pavy4, Mélanie Santo4 and Pierre Boissery5, (1)United States, (2)Chorus, Grenoble, France, (3)Andromède Océanologie, Mauguio, France, (4)Independent Scholar, France, (5)agence de l'eau RMC, Marseille, France
Characterizing the soundscape in deep water off Hawaii (652354)
Karlina Merkens, Lynker Technologies (contractor to NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center), Portland, OR, United States, Simone Baumann-Pickering, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, Acoustic Ecology Laboratory, La Jolla, CA, United States, Jennifer S Trickey, University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, Ann Allen, National Marine Fisheries Services, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, United States and Erin Oleson, NOAA, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, United States
Temperate reef soundscapes exhibit similar temporal patterns but distinct spectral content: a comparison of natural and artificial reefs (639693)
Rebecca Van Hoeck1, Avery Paxton2, Delwayne R Bohnenstiehl3, J. Christopher Taylor4, Joel Fodrie5, Douglas P. Nowacek6, Christine M. Voss7 and Charles H. Peterson7, (1)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Biology, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, (2)NOAA Beaufort, National Center for Coastal Ocean Service, Beaufort, NC, United States, (3)North Carolina State Univ., Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Raleigh, NC, United States, (4)NOAA Beaufort, National Center for Coastal Ocean Science, Beaufort, NC, United States, (5)University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC, United States, (6)Duke University Marine Lab, Nicholas School of the Environment & Pratt School of Engineering, Beaufort, NC, United States, (7)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, United States
Considering the Soundscape from the Larval Fish Perspective: Predicting the Depth and Frequency Dependence of the Acoustic Cues Received during the Settlement Process (656606)
Andria K Salas1, Megan S Ballard2, T. Aran Mooney1 and Preston S Wilson3, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)Applied Research Laboratories at the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, United States, (3)University of Texas at Austin, Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Research Laboratories, Austin, TX, United States
Hot loud ocean: temperature drives acoustic output by a dominant biological sound-producer (651501)
T Aran Mooney and Ashlee Lillis, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States