ME23B:
Pelagic Tunicates: Interactions with the Lower Food Web, Higher Trophic Levels, and Effects on Biogeochemistry I

Session ID#: 93069

Session Description:
Pelagic tunicates can play substantial roles in shaping and modifying material fluxes, trophic interactions, recycling, and export processes within the oceanic environment.  Salps can enhance carbon export via the production of fast-sinking fecal pellets, appendicularians contribute to the production of marine snow through discarded houses, and pyrosomes can occupy distinct niches within the water column and enhance carbon transport via vertical migration.  All organisms are capable of extremely high growth and grazing rates, such that when they bloom they significantly alter trophic interactions and biogeochemical fluxes.  This session is timely as abundances of salps and pyrosomes are reported to be increasing in certain regions of the ocean.  Studies focusing on the interactions between these organisms and the lower trophic levels are especially needed to understand the underlying causes of changing abundances, and to quantify bloom effects on phytoplankton growth and grazing, bacterial remineralization, and biogeochemistry.  Pelagic tunicates also have different predators compared to crustacean zooplankton, and the lack of quantitative information on these trophic interactions precludes their inclusion into large-scale food-web models.  In this session, we welcome presentations that investigate pelagic tunicates and their interactions with the lower food-web, as well as their effects on higher trophic levels, bacterial processes, carbon export, and nutrient dynamics, at all scales.
Index Terms:

1615 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4890 Zooplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Co-chairs:  Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand and Scott Nodder, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand
Primary Liaison:  Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Moderators:  Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States and Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Scott Nodder, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Salp Grazing Effects on the Lower Food Web and Carbon Export, in Subtropical and Subantartic Waters East of New Zealand (652909)
Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Karen E Selph, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Karl Safi, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton, New Zealand, Scott D Nodder, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Florian Lüskow, University of British Columbia, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Christian Fender, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, United States and Morgan Meyers, San Francisco State University - Romberg Tiburon Center, Biology, Tiburon, CA, United States
Salp-Mediated Export Processes in the Northeast Subarctic Pacific Ocean (655488)
Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, Karen Stamieszkin, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, United States, Amy E Maas, Arizona State University, Tempe, United States, Colleen A Durkin, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Uta Passow, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NF, Canada, Margaret L Estapa, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Montserrat Roca-Marti, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, United States and Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Microzooplankton grazing and phytoplankton growth in salp-dominated subantarctic waters in austral summer 2018: results from seawater dilution experiments omitting salps, competitors and predators of microzooplankton (639860)
Karen E Selph, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Karl Safi, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton, New Zealand, Thomas Bryce Kelly, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Natalie Yingling, Florida State University, Tallahassee, United States, Siobhan O'Connor, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Biological Sciences, Wellington, New Zealand and Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Role of Salps in Mesopelagic Food Webs: Metabarcoding Analysis of Trophic Interactions and Diet Diversity (645441)
Paola G. Batta-Lona1, Joel Llopiz2, Annette Govindarajan2 and Ann C Bucklin1, (1)University of Connecticut, Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
The limited effect of salps on the coupling between microzooplankton and phytoplankton in subtropical and subantarctic oceanic waters east of New Zealand (649179)
Siobhan O'Connor, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Biological Sciences, Wellington, New Zealand, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Natalie Yingling, Florida State University, Tallahassee, United States, Thomas Bryce Kelly, Florida State University, Earth Ocean and Atmospheric Science Department, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Karen E Selph, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Karl Safi, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton, New Zealand, Adriana Lopes dos Santos, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore, Alexia Saint-Macary, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, Maxim Y Gorbunov, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Scott D Nodder, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand and Moira Decima, NIWA National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand
Interactions between the filter-feeding appendicularian Oikopleura dioica and the abundance and fate of marine viruses (651309)
Kyle Mayers1, Janice Lawrence2, Joachim Töpper3, Katrine Sandnes Skaar1, Elzbieta Petelenz4, Aud Larsen1, Gunnar Bratbak4 and Jessica Louise Ray5, (1)NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Bergen, Norway, (2)University of New Brunswick, NB, Canada, (3)Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Norway, (4)University of Bergen, Norway, (5)NORCE Norwegian Research Center, Bergen, Norway
Tunicate food chain: a key process of high fishery production in oligotrophic Kuroshio ecosystem (656543)
Hiroaki Saito, The University of Tokyo, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, Kashiwa, Japan, Yuji Okazaki, Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Shiogama, Japan and Yuichiro Nishibe, The University of Tokyo, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan
Global ecological and biogeochemical impacts of pelagic tunicates: a modeling study (653065)
Jessica Y Luo, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States, Charles A Stock, NOAA/GFDL, Princeton, NJ, United States and John P Dunne, NOAA Geophys Fluid Dynamic, Princeton, United States