OB13A:
Benthic and Bentho-Pelagic Community Connectivity from Coastal to Deep-Ocean Environments I

Session ID#: 93096

Session Description:
Water column and benthic processes are fundamentally connected through bentho-pelagic coupling, which comprises the exchange of organisms, energy, mass and nutrients between the water column and seafloor. Recent studies and the advent of new technology have shed light on how bentho-pelagic coupling connects pelagic and seafloor communities through the processes of energy flux, carbon sequestration, organismal transport, larval settlement, and fisheries production. From the land-ocean boundary to the deep sea, organismal biodiversity is key to sustaining ocean ecosystems, however, the drivers giving rise to different patterns of biodiversity on the seafloor are still not fully understood. To highlight recent advances at the bentho-pelagic interface and the processes giving rise to seafloor biodiversity patterns, this multidisciplinary session aims to bring together scientists working on benthic and pelagic communities from coastal to deep environments and focused on micro- to macro- scales. We also welcome presentations on how these bentho-pelagic interactions and biodiversity patterns are affected by anthropogenic stressors including climate change, fisheries pressure, minerals mining, and plastic pollution.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
Index Terms:

4804 Benthic processes, benthos [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4890 Zooplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Natalya Gallo, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Jeroen Ingels, Florida State University, St. Teresa, FL, United States and Amanda Nicole Netburn, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Silver Spring, United States
Primary Liaison:  Natalya Gallo, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States
Moderators:  Amanda Nicole Netburn, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Silver Spring, United States and Jeroen Ingels, Florida State University, St. Teresa, FL, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Jeroen Ingels, Florida State University, St. Teresa, FL, United States and Natalya Gallo, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Fish community structure and bentho-pelagic coupling by fish from shelf to open ocean environments (650232)
Daniel Daniël van Denderen, Denmark Technical University, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark, Colleen Petrik, Texas A&M University, Department of Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, Charles A Stock, NOAA/GFDL, Princeton, NJ, United States and Ken H Andersen, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Aqua, Kgs Lyngby, Denmark
Oxygen Minimum Zones Impact Bentho-Pelagic Coupling on Upwelling Margins with Implications for Demersal Fisheries Productivity (657739)
Natalya D. Gallo, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA, United States, Jaxine Wolfe, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States, Maryanne Beckwith, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Rasmus Swalethorp, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States, Brice Semmens, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States and Lisa A Levin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
Abundance and Composition of Available Zooplankton for Cold-water Coral Nutrition in Comau fjord, Chile (645626)
Nur Garcia-Herrera1,2, Astrid Cornils1, Barbara Niehoff1, Jürgen Laudien1, Gertraud Maria Schmidt1, Verena Häussermann3,4, Humberto E Gonzalez3,5 and Claudio Richter1,2, (1)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany, (2)University of Bremen, Biology/Chemistry, Bremen, Germany, (3)Austral University of Chile, Institute of Marine and Limnological Sciences, Valdivia, Chile, (4)Huinay Scientific Field Station, Huinay, Chile, (5)Research Center: Dynamics of High Latitude Marine Ecosystems (IDEAL), Punta Arenas, Chile
Consideration of midwater ecosystems is required to fully evaluate the environmental risks of deep-sea mining (656840)
Jeffrey Drazen1, Craig R Smith2, Kristina Gjerde3, Steven H D Haddock4, Glenn S Carter5, Malcolm R Clark6, Anela Choy7, Pierre Dutrieux8, Erica Goetze2, Chris Hauton9, Mariko Hatta10, J. Anthony Koslow11, Astrid Brigitta Leitner12, Aude Pacini13, Thomas Peacock14, Jessica Nicole Perelman15, Tracey Sutton16, Les Watling17 and Hiroyuki Yamamoto18, (1)University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)International Union for Conservation of Nature, Cambridge, United States, (4)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (5)University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (6)National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, (7)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Integrative Oceanography Division, La Jolla, CA, United States, (8)Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, (9)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, United Kingdom, (10)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (11)University of California, SD, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (12)University of Hawaii, Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (13)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, United States, (14)Dept of Mech Eng - RM 1-310, Cambridge, MA, United States, (15)University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (16)Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States, (17)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (18)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Kanagawa, Japan
Linking pelagic production and sea scallop energy requirement on the Northeast U.S. Shelf: A model-based assessment (637065)
Rubao Ji, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Zhixuan Feng, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Deborah Hart, NOAA Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Changsheng Chen, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, New Bedford, MA, United States, Liuzhi Zhao, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, United States and Cabell Davis, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Meiofauna life on loggerhead and hawksbill sea turtles (650822)
Giovanni dos Santos1, Yirina Vazquez2, Letícia Pontes1, Ian Silver-Gorges3, Alexandra Silva4, Quintin Bergman5, Mariana Fuentes3, Sofia Zarate6 and Jeroen Ingels7, (1)UFPE Federal University of Pernambuco, Zoology, Recife, Brazil, (2)Federal University of Paraiba, Biology, Areia, Brazil, (3)Florida State University, Tallahassee, United States, (4)UFPE Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil, (5)Purdue University, Fort Wayne, United States, (6)Columbia University, New York, United States, (7)Florida State University, FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, St Teresa, FL, United States
Multi-scale Characterization of Mesopelagic Organisms including Three-dimensional Imaging Lidar (647351)
Trevor McKenzie1, Michael Twardowski1, Aditya R Nayak1, Fraser Dalgleish2, Kevin M Boswell3 and Brandon James Russell4, (1)Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Ft. Pierce, FL, United States, (2)Harris Corporation Melbourne, Melbourne, FL, United States, (3)Florida International University, Biological Sciences, North Miami, FL, United States, (4)Labsphere, Inc., North Sutton, NH, United States
Patterns of Seafloor Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in the Clarion Clipperton Zone: Are No-Mining Areas Representative of Regional Patterns? (656698)
Craig R Smith, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Malcolm R Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand and Participating Scientists in the Deep CCZ Biodiversity Synthesis Workshop