OB52A:
Beyond Just Discovery in the Ocean’s Midwater: Novel and Mechanistic Approaches to Understanding Mesopelagic and Bathypelagic Ecosystems II

Session ID#: 93104

Session Description:
There is a long history of exploring the ocean’s midwater realm. However, a recent surge in focus on mesopelagic and bathypelagic ecosystems is leading to advances that are greatly enhancing our understanding of the dynamics, functioning, and importance of this massive region of the world’s oceans. We invite researchers around the globe focusing on any aspect related to the ocean’s midwater regime to come together to share their recent findings and, collectively, elucidate the current and future state of midwater research. Focus can span technological development, physics, biogeochemistry, biology, ecology, conservation, and management. Specific examples of such foci include: biomass and biodiversity measurements through the use of acoustics, optical imaging, genetics, and traditional net sampling; novel tools and technologies to study midwater properties and processes; life history characteristics and behaviors of midwater organisms, including those related to diel vertical migration; the role of midwater organisms in carbon flux; trophic pathways in midwater ecosystems, including the role of surface-water dynamics and the use of deep pelagic ecosystems by oceanic top predators; and implications of harvesting of midwater organisms and potential conservation and management strategies.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
Index Terms:

4294 Instruments and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Joel Llopiz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Co-chairs:  Annette Govindarajan1, Christopher Bassett2 and Peter H Wiebe1, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States(2)Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Joel Llopiz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Annette Govindarajan, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Peter H Wiebe, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Christopher Bassett, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Application of simultaneous trawl-mounted optic and acoustic methods to study the mesopelagic ecosystem (650466)
Shale Rosen, Eva García-Seoane, Melanie Underwood, Thor Klevjer, Gavin Macaulay, Mette Dalgaard Agersted, Espen Strand and Webjorn Melle, Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway
Mesopelagic Ecosystem and Biological Pump Powered by Mesopelagic Fish in the Northern South China Sea (648291)
Meng Zhou1, Xianyong Zhao2, Zuozhi Chen3, Ying Wu4, Xiao-Xia Sun5, Jun Xu6, Xinliang Wang2, JUN Zhang7, Yiwu Zhu6, Ziyuan Hu5, Dongfeng Xu8 and Shan Zheng5, (1)Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China, (2)Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, China, (3)Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, China, (4)East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, (5)Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanology, China, (6)Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, (7)Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, (8)State Ocean Administration Second Institute of Oceanography, China
The deep-pelagic realm as a ‘biological desert’?... hardly. A case study of a highly speciose meso/bathypelagic ecoregion, the Gulf of Mexico. (653793)
Tracey Sutton1, Jon Moore2, April B Cook3, Andrea Bernard4, Ron Eytan5, Max Weber5 and Mahmood Shivji6, (1)Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States, (2)Honors College, Florida Atlantic University, FL, United States, (3)Nova Southeastern University, Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, Dania Beach, FL, United States, (4)Nova Southeastern University, United States, (5)Texas A&M University Galveston, United States, (6)London, United Kingdom
Are Life History Traits of Mesopelagic Fish Stable? An Examination of Reproductive Traits of a Lanternfish in the Central Pacific Ocean (648942)
Erik Franklin, University of Hawaii, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kaneohe, HI, United States, Richard Chen, University of Hawaii, Department of Biology, Honolulu, United States, Ross Langston, Windward Community College, Natural Sciences Department, Kaneohe, HI, United States, Ken Longenecker, Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, United States and Jeffrey Drazen, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, United States
In situ, three-dimensional imaging of centimeter-scale biophysical interactions and particle distributions with the deep-sea plenoptic camera EyeRIS (653297)
Paul Roberts1, Jon Erickson1, Denis Klimov1, Richard Henthorn1, Alana Sherman1, Henry Ruhl2 and Kakani Katija1, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, CeNCOOS, Moss Landing, CA, United States
Metabarcoding Analysis of Diet Diversity of Mesopelagic Fishes and Salps (646016)
Ann C Bucklin1, Paola G. Batta-Lona1, Melissa Wojcicki1, Sarah G Glancy2, Annette Govindarajan2 and Joel Llopiz2, (1)University of Connecticut, Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Interpreting environmental DNA (eDNA) signals: insights from eDNA shedding and decay rates from diverse animal forms (640455)
Elizabeth Allan, Andone C Lavery, Weifeng Gordon Zhang and Annette Govindarajan, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
The RAD Sampler: Rotary-actuated folding polyhedrons for midwater investigation of delicate marine organisms (646632)
Brennan Phillips1, Zhi Ern Teoh2, Kaitlyn P Becker3, Griffin Whittredge4, James C Weaver3, Chuck Hoberman3, David F Gruber5 and Robert J Wood3, (1)University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)Cooper Perkins, Inc., United States, (3)Harvard University, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Cambridge, MA, United States, (4)Dover Motion, MA, United States, (5)City University of New York, Baruch College, New York, NY, United States