OB31A:
Biological Hot Spots in the Deep Sea: Natural Variability and Adaptation to Changing Oceans I

Session ID#: 93112

Session Description:
The deep-sea is often considered as the last wilderness on earth and provides habitat to many vulnerable and often unexplored ecosystems. These ecosystems support high species biodiversity and biomass, and provide goods and services that are vital for the health and wellbeing of our planet. Ecosystems such as cold-water coral and sponge reefs not only support a great diversity of life, but are also seriously affected by human activities and climate change. Biogeochemical dynamics, distribution, interconnections and adaptation of these ecosystems to anthropogenic change are key values to understand ecosystem functioning through time and make predictions for the future. This session will focus on benthic biological hotspot ecosystems in the deep sea, including seamounts, submarine canyons and continental slopes. Presenters are encouraged from different fields studying biogeographic patterns, biodiversity (macro to microscale), biogeochemistry, oceanography, paleoclimatological characteristics, and stressors of these fragile ecosystems.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Furu Mienis, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands; NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands
Co-chairs:  Hans Tore Rapp, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, Andrew J Davies, University of Rhode Island, Bangor, United Kingdom and , University of Amsterdam, Freshwater and marine ecology, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Primary Liaison:  Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands; Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands
Moderators:  Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands and Andrew J Davies, University of Rhode Island, Bangor, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Synaphobranchid Swarms at Seamount Summits: Biological Hotspots in the Abyssal Ocean (647682)
Astrid Brigitta Leitner, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States; Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Jeffrey Drazen, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, United States, Craig R Smith, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States and Jennifer M Durden, University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton, United Kingdom
Benthic and Near-Bottom-Water Bacteria and Archaea on Abyssal Plains and Seamounts of the Western Clarion-Clipperton Zone: A Comparison of Community Structure and Functional Potential (654470)
Emma Wear1, Craig R Smith2, Jeffrey Drazen3 and Matthew Church1, (1)University of Montana, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Polson, MT, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, United States
A Community Consensus on Designating Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems from Imagery (649194)
Amy Baco-Taylor1, Rebecca Ross2, Franzis Althaus3, Amelia Bridges4, Saskia Brix5, Ana Colaço6, Malcolm R Clark7, Cherisse Du Preez8, Mari-Lise Franken9, Genoveva Gonzalez-Mirelis10, Ellen Kenchington11, Lisa A Levin12, Dhugal Lindsay13, Tina Molodtsova14, Nicole Morgan15, Telmo Morato16, Beatriz Eugenia Mejia-Mercado1, David O'Sullivan17, Karine Olu18, Tabitha Pearman19, David Price19, Katleen Robert20, Ashley Alun Rowden7, James Taylor21, Lisette Victorero22, Les Watling23, Alan Williams3, Chris Yesson24 and the DOSI working group on VMEs from Imagery, (1)Florida State University, Earth, Ocean, Atmospheric Sciences, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (2)Institute of Marine Research, Norway, (3)CSIRO, TAS, Australia, (4)Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, (5)Seckenberg Research Institute, Germany, (6)University of the Azores, Institute of Marine Research, Ponta Delgada, Portugal, (7)National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, (8)Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Deep-Sea Ecology Program, Sidney, BC, Canada, (9)South African National Biodiversity Institute, South Africa, (10)Institute of Marine Research Bergen, Bergen, Norway, (11)Bedforf Institute of Oceanography, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS, Canada, (12)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, (13)Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan, (14)P.P Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Moscow, Russia, (15)Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (16)University of Azores, Portugal, (17)Irish Marine Institute, Galway, Ireland, (18)IFREMER, Plouzané, France, (19)National Oceanography Center, Soton, Southampton, United Kingdom, (20)Memorial University of Newfoundland, Fisheries and Marine Institute, St John's, NF, Canada, (21)Senckenberg, Germany, (22)Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, France, (23)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (24)Zoological Society of London, London, United Kingdom
A Mechanistic Modelling Approach to Predict Cold-Water Coral Biomass Based on Organic Matter and Hydrodynamics (655736)
Evert de Froe1, Christian Mohn2, Karline Soetaert3, Anna van der Kaaden3 and Dick van Oevelen3, (1)NIOZ, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University, Department of Ocean Systems, Den Burg, Netherlands, (2)Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus C, Denmark, (3)NIOZ, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University, Department of Estuarine and Delta Systems, Yerseke, Netherlands
Biogeochemical regimes in the oceanic Southeastern United States: Deep-sea black corals and exported primary production (651853)
John Schiff, Texas A&M University College Station, College Station, TX, United States, E. Brendan Roark, Texas A&M University College Station, Department of Geography, College Station, TX, United States and Nancy Prouty, U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center, Santa Cruz, United States
Microbial Diversity of Deep-sea Sponges - an Ecological Perspective across Scales (645472)
Kathrin Busch1, Beate M. Slaby1, Hans Tore Rapp2, the SponGES Consortium2 and Ute Hentschel1, (1)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (2)University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Exploring the Interactions between Geologic and Biologic Processes in the Poorly Known Submarine Canyons Off Cape Hatteras, U.S. Atlantic Margin (656954)
Jason D Chaytor1, Amanda W Demopoulos2, Martha S Nizinski3, Brian D Andrews1, Ryan Gasbarro4 and Erik E Cordes4, (1)USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)US Geological Survey, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesville, FL, United States, (3)NOAA, NMFS, National Systematics Laboratory, Washington, DC, United States, (4)Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States
Structure of Deep-sea Food Webs at Two Submarine Canyons and Adjacent Slope Habitats: from Trophic Niches to Isoscapes (651339)
Amanda W Demopoulos, U.S.G.S., Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesveille, FL, United States, Jennifer McClain-Counts, USGS, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, United States, Jill R Bourque, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesville, FL, United States, Jason D Chaytor, USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Sandra Brooke, Florida State University, Coastal and Marine Lab, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Steve W Ross, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, Center for Marine Science, Wilmington, NC, United States, Brian J Smith, USGS, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesville, FL, United States and Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands