OB43A:
Complexity, Connectivity, and Change in Southern Ocean Food Webs I

Session ID#: 93116

Session Description:
Changes in ice, ocean and ecosystem dynamics in the Southern Ocean are affecting biodiversity at all trophic levels, from plankton to whales. These reflect multiple drivers of change and the complexity and heterogeneity of ecosystems and ecological responses. Food-web processes are fundamental in maintaining the structure, functioning and resilience of ecosystems and hence in ecological responses to change. Improved understanding of Southern Ocean food webs is crucial for developing models to project the impacts of future change and informing decision making for conservation and management. An international and interdisciplinary approach is required to link studies of food webs with analyses of biogeochemical cycles and physical and chemical processes at multiple scales. This session is intended to bring together studies on emerging areas of research including the spatial and temporal variability and connectivity of food webs, food web resilience properties and biodiversity, interactions between pelagic, sea-ice or benthic food webs, importance of food-web processes in biogeochemical cycles (including carbon budgets) and combined effects of past and current harvesting and climate-related changes on individual species and their food web interactions. Presentations that report field, data syntheses and modelling studies that elucidate the structure and dynamics of Southern Ocean food webs are encouraged.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • AI - Air-Sea Interactions
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Nadine Johnston, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Ecosystems, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Co-chairs:  Andrea M Pinones, Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Limnológicas, Valdivia, Chile, Eugene John Murphy, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Eileen E Hofmann, Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Nadine Johnston, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Ecosystems, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Moderators:  Eugene John Murphy, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Eileen E Hofmann, Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Stuart Corney, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

On the role of phytoplankton community structure for Southern Ocean carbon export and air-sea CO2 exchange – a model assessment (645621)
Cara Nissen, ETH Zurich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Zurich, Switzerland, Nicolas Gruber, ETH Zurich, Environmental Physics, Zurich, Switzerland, Meike Vogt, ETH Zurich, Environmental Systems Science, Zurich, Switzerland and Matthias Munnich, ETH Zurich, Environmental Systems Science, Switzerland
Synoptic-scale Weather Imprints on Upper-Ocean Physics and Phytoplankton Blooms in the Southern Ocean (648259)
Magdalena M Carranza, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States, Ivy Frenger, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, Alejandro Di Luca, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Matthew C Long, National Center for Atm Res, Boulder, CO, United States, Colin M. Zarzycki, Penn State University, Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, State College, United States, Riley Xavier Brady, University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States and Daniel B Whitt, NASA, Mountain View, CA, United States
Zooplankton and micronekton respond to climate fluctuations in the Amundsen Sea polynya, Antarctica (643024)
Hyoung Sul La1, Keyhong Park2, Anna Wahlin3, Kevin R Arrigo4, Dongseon Kim5, Eun Jin Yang1, Angus Atkinson6, Sophie Fielding7, Jungho Im8, Tae-Wan Kim2, Hyeong Chul Shin9, SangHoon Lee2 and Ho Kyung Ha10, (1)Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, South Korea, (2)KOPRI Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, Korea, Republic of (South), (3)University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, (4)Stanford University, Earth System Science, Stanford, CA, United States, (5)Korea Ocean Research & Develop, Ansan, Korea, Republic of (South), (6)Plymouth Marine Lab, Plymouth, United Kingdom, (7)British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (8)Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan, South Korea, (9)KOPRI, South Korea, (10)Inha University, South Korea
Biomass Density and Transport of Antarctic Krill Measured Using Echosounders and ADCPs Aboard Autonomous Gliders and Moorings (655742)
Christian Reiss1, George Cutter1, Jen Walsh2, Anthony Cossio1, George Watters1, Douglas Krause1 and Jefferson Hinke1, (1)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division, San Diego, CA, United States
The Effect of Autumn and Winter Diet on the Physiology of Juvenile Antarctic Krill (643121)
Kim Sarah Bernard1, Kirsten Steinke1 and Julia Fontana2, (1)Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2)Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, United States
Environmental Drivers of Antarctic Krill Distribution in the South Orkney Islands Region (641471)
Emma Frances Young1, Sally E Thorpe1, Eugene John Murphy1 and Angelika Renner2, (1)British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Institute of Marine Research Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Impacts of environmental variability on the Kerguelen Plateau marine ecosystem (644375)
Stuart Corney, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, Nicole A Hill, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Gabriela Semolini Pilo, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia and Neil John Holbrook, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Penguins as ecosystem proxies? Identifying millennial-scale shifts in carbon sources and phytoplankton regimes in the Antarctic marine ecosystem (651911)
Chantel Michelson1, Kelton McMahon2, William Paul Patterson3, Steven D Emslie4 and Michael J Polito1, (1)Louisiana State University, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Baton Rouge, LA, United States, (2)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (3)University of Saskatchewan, Department of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, SK, Canada, (4)University of North Carolina Wilmington, Department of Biology & Marine Biology, Wilmington, NC, United States