OB11A:
Energy Metabolism and Calcification in Marine Organisms: Mechanisms and Responses to Environmental Stress I

Session ID#: 93128

Session Description:
Environmental temperature, salinity, oxygen, and pH/carbonate chemistry can profoundly affect the energy budget of marine organisms, thus negatively affecting their fitness and competitive ability in the ecosystem. It is often claimed that environmental stress increases the costs of homeostatic processes at the expense of reproduction and growth, yet little experimental data exists to support this idea. It is also unclear whether biomineral precursors are formed intra- or extracellularly and how important extra- and intracellular acid-base regulation is for biomineralization processes. Further, energetic costs of biomineralization, as well as potential species-specific differences are poorly understood. This session will bring together researchers working on whole organism and cellular energy budgets of marine organisms, with a focus on mechanistic aspects of cellular homeostasis, energy metabolism and biomineralization, and the effects of environmental stress. We hope to facilitate discussions leading to improved energy budget models, with the ultimate goal of better forecasting potential impacts of natural and ongoing anthropogenic environmental change on marine organisms.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • OC - Ocean Change: Acidification and Hypoxia
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1635 Oceans [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4220 Coral reef systems [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4825 Geochemistry [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology, Kiel, Germany
Co-Chair:  Martin Tresguerres, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology, Kiel, Germany
Moderators:  Martin Tresguerres, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States and Frank Melzner, GEOMAR, Marine Ecology
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR, Marine Ecology

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Mineral formation in the primary polyps of pocilloporoid corals (638768)
Tali Mass, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Thermal stress reduces Pocilloporid coral resilience to ocean acidification by impairing control over calcifying fluid chemistry: A combined boron geochemistry and pH microelectrode study (653781)
Robert Eagle1, Maxence Guillermic2, Louise Cameron3, Ilian Antoine DeCorte4, Sambuddha Misra5, Jelle Bijma6, Dirk de Beer7, Claire Reymond8, Hildegard Westphal8,9 and Justin B Ries10, (1)University of California Los Angeles, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)University of California Los Angeles, Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, United States, (3)Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States, (4)University of California - Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (5)Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Centre for Earth Sciences, Bangalore, India, (6)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany, (7)Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany, (8)Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology, Bremen, Germany, (9)MAGILL, SA, Australia, (10)Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Nahant, MA, United States
Acquisition and allocation of carbon via autotrophic and heterotrophic pathways: Implications for sexual reproduction in corals after bleaching (652150)
Lisa J Rodrigues, Villanova University, Villanova, PA, United States and Jacqueline L Padilla-Gamino, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States
Fitness and energetic consequences of introducing reef-building corals to reefs with distinct seawater pH regimes (651899)
Katie Barott1, Ariana Huffmyer2, Jen Davidson2, Shayle Matsuda3, Elizabeth Lenz4, Josh Hancock2, Teegan Innis5, Hollie Putnam6 and Ruth Gates7, (1)University of Pennsylvania, Biology, Philadelphia, PA, United States, (2)Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, United States, (3)Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, San Francisco, United States, (4)University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (5)University of Pennsylvania, United States, (6)University of Rhode Island, College of the Environment and Life Sciences, Kingston, RI, United States, (7)Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, HI, United States
Calcification in the Coralline Algae: A Synthesis and Conceptual Model (657847)
Sophie J. Mccoy, Florida State University, Department of Biological Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Curt M Pueschel, Binghamton University, Department of Biological Sciences, NY, United States, Sven Alexander Kranz, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Christopher Edward Cornwall, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Biological Sciences, New Zealand, Steeve Comeau, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, France, Nathan Spindel, Florida State University, Department of Biological Science, FL, United States and Michael A Borowitzka, Murdoch University, TAS, Australia
Shifts in Allocation of Metabolic Energy Highlight Biochemical Bases of Resilience to Environmental Change (653018)
Francis Pan, Scott Applebaum and Donal T. Manahan, University of Southern California, Biological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Oxygen Supply and Demand at the Incipient Lethal Oxygen Level. (652479)
Brad Seibel, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, St Petersburg, FL, United States