OB13B:
Marine Snow and Associated Small-Scale Processes with Large-Scale Implications I

Session ID#: 93157

Session Description:
Marine aggregates of phytoplankton, detritus, and inorganic matter, known as marine snow, play a crucial role in global ocean dynamics in many ways. Marine snow aggregates represent fast sinking vehicles of particulate organic matter, accelerating the vertical downward flux of photosynthetically-fixed carbon to the deep ocean. Sinking aggregates are often densely colonized by highly active heterotrophic microbial communities and serve as a food source for zooplankton, making them hotspots for elemental cycling and trophic interactions in the water column. In addition marine snow aggregates also play an important role in the fate of contaminants, such as plastics and spilled oil, as they may incorporate these substances during formation and sinking through the water column. Through all of these small-scale processes, marine snow can have important implications for biogeochemical and ecological dynamics at much larger scales. This session welcomes presentations on marine snow research (including laboratory, field, and modeling studies) focusing on any biological, physical, or chemical processes involving marine snow, such as: 1) formation, sinking, and fragmentation processes of marine snow; 2) biogeochemical cycling of marine snow-associated organic matter; 3) interactions between marine snow and zooplankton grazers; or 4) marine snow processes involving oil, plastics, or other contaminants.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Jennifer C. Prairie, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Uta Passow, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Kai Ziervogel, University of New Hampshire, Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, Durham, NH, United States
Primary Liaison:  Jennifer C. Prairie, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States
Moderators:  Jennifer C. Prairie, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States and Kai Ziervogel, University of New Hampshire, Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, Durham, NH, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Jennifer C. Prairie, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

A Path Towards Modeling Marine Particle Disaggregation through In-Situ Measurements of Fragmentation Strength (637564)
Matthew Rau1, Yixuan Song1 and Steven G Ackleson2, (1)Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States, (2)Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., DC, United States
The SNOWMAN: a new experimental device to study quantitatively the link between phytoplankton community structure, the dynamics of marine snow formation and export time lag. (645235)
Emmanuel Christian Laurenceau-Cornec1, Alan Henderson2, Chris Young3, Matthieu Bressac1, Robert F Strzepek4, Lennart Thomas Bach1, Brivaëla Moriceau5, Jordan Toullec6 and Philip W. Boyd7, (1)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Ecology and Biodiversity, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)University of Tasmania, TAS, Australia, (3)Australian Antarctic Division, TAS, Australia, (4)University of Tasmania, Antarctic Gateway Partnership, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), Hobart, TAS, Australia, (5)CNRS, LEMAR, IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Plouzané, France, (6)University of Western Brittany, Plouzané, France, (7)Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Unravelling the dynamics of pelagic ecosystems by quantitative observation of morphological attributes of marine snow: a case study in the Arctic. (650120)
Emilia Trudnowska, Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland, Leo Lacour, Unité Mixte Internationale Takuvik (CNRS / U. Laval), Quebec City, QC, Canada, Andreas Rogge, Institute for Ecosystem Research, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany; Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, Jean Olivier Irisson, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche (LOV), UMR 7093, Sorbonne Université, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France, Anya M Waite, Ocean Frontier Institute, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, Marcel Babin, Takuvik Joint International Laboratory, Université Laval & CNRS, Québec, QC, Canada and Lars Stemmann, Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche (LOV), UMR 7093, Sorbonne Université, Villefranche sur mer, France
Sinking vs. remineralisation: Active controls of zooplankton on marine snow dynamics (649867)
Klas Ove Moeller, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany and Morten H. Iversen, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany; MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
The effect of phytoplankton properties on the ingestion rate of marine snow by Calanus pacificus (655220)
Grace Frances Cawley1, Jennifer C. Prairie1 and Moira Décima2, (1)University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand
Are Traditional Lab Experiments Biasing Our Understanding Of Microbial Processes On Organic Matter Particles? (652152)
Mina Bizic, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Experimental Limnology, Berlin, Germany, Danny Ionescu, Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany and Hans-Peter Grossart, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Dep. 3, Experimental Limnology, Stechlin/OT Neuglobsow, Germany
The Sedimentation and Lateral Transport of Oil-Associated Marine Snow During and After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (643338)
Kendra L Daly1, Ana Carolina Vaz2 and Claire B B Paris2, (1)University of South Florida, St Petersburg, FL, United States, (2)University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
Transcriptome-wide responses of marine snow aggregates of the diatom Odontella aurita to oil (651621)
Laura Bretherton1, Yue Liang2, Christopher Malcolm Brown3, Deepak Nanjappa2, Uta Passow4, Antonietta Quigg5, Andrew J Irwin6 and Zoe Finkel2, (1)Mount Allison University, NB, Canada, (2)Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, United States, (4)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (5)Texas A&M University at Galveston, Marine Biology, Galveston, TX, United States, (6)Dalhousie University, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Halifax, NS, Canada