OB21B:
New Tools and Approaches to Constrain the Marine Nitrogen Cycle: From the Surface to the Sediments II

Session ID#: 93165

Session Description:
Nitrogen (N) exerts an important control on marine productivity affecting ocean deoxygenation and climate relevant gases such as CO2 and N2O. Natural and anthropogenic changes can significantly alter the marine N cycle. Understanding what controls the rates and distribution of key N-cycle processes (including but not limited to atmospheric deposition, riverine discharge, N2 fixation, N-loss, nitrification, organic production and recycling) and their interaction with other biogeochemical cycles (e.g. C, P, Fe, O2) is therefore of fundamental importance for predicting the response and resilience of marine biogeochemistry to ongoing climate change and pollution. We invite contributions that use various techniques (such as isotopes, molecular, biomarkers, modelling) to study N-cycle processes, covering diverse spatial and temporal scales. This session strives to bring together observationalists, experimentalists, and modellers to promote an integrated understanding of the N-cycle and its sensitivity to environmental change.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Christopher J Somes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Co-chairs:  Mar Benavides, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Marseille Cedex 09, France, Angela Landolfi, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany and Carolin R. Löscher, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
Primary Liaison:  Christopher J Somes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Moderators:  Christopher J Somes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany and Angela Landolfi, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Biogeochemical Modeling, Kiel, Germany
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Christopher J Somes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

New Proteomic Windows into the Marine Nitrogen Cycle (657210)
Jacob Waldbauer1, Maureen Coleman2 and Lichun Zhang1, (1)University of Chicago, Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL, United States, (2)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
Towards a global understanding of the role of urea in the ocean nitrogen cycle (650509)
Peter L Croot, iCRAG (Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences), Earth and Ocean Sciences, School of Natural Sciences and the Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland, Alina Wieczorek, National University of Ireland Galway, Earth and Ocean Sciences, School of Natural Sciences and Ryan Institute, Glaway, Ireland and Maija Iris Heller, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Chile, Escuela de Ciencias del Mar, Valparaiso, Chile
Iron requirements and uptake strategies of the globally abundant marine ammonia-oxidising archaeon, Nitrosopumilus maritimus strain SCM1 (648277)
Roxana Shafiee, Joseph T Snow, Qiong Zhang and Rosalind E M Rickaby, University of Oxford, Earth Sciences, Oxford, United Kingdom
Unusual nitrification patterns in a eutrophic coastal basin analyzed by geochemical, isotopic (δ15N) and microbiological data from a highly-resolved in situ time series. (655745)
Sebastian Haas1, Brent M. Robicheau2, Julie LaRoche2, Tim Kalvelage3, Subhadeep Rakshit3 and Douglas Wallace3, (1)University of Washington, Earth and Space Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Dalhousie University, Department of Biology, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada
Nitrogen cycling and circulation in Baffin Bay investigated with isotopic measurements of N2, N2O, and NO3- (648895)
Cara C Manning1, Annie Bourbonnais2, Julie Granger3, Roberta Claire Hamme4, Laurence Yeung5, David Armando Valerio6, Edward D Young7, Zhiyin Zheng8, Nadine Lehmann9, Jean-Eric Tremblay10 and Philippe Tortell1, (1)University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (2)University of South Carolina, School of the Earth, Ocean & Environment, Columbia, SC, United States, (3)University of Connecticut, Department of Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States, (4)University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC, Canada, (5)Rice University, Houston, United States, (6)Rice University, Houston, TX, United States, (7)University of California Los Angeles, Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (8)University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (9)Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada, (10)Laval University, Biology, Quebec City, QC, Canada
Can we use functional genetics to constrain the fate of nitrate in estuaries? (638358)
Eric Raes1, Kristen Karsh1, Adam J. Kessler2, Bronwyn Holmes1, Jodie van de Kamp1, Levente Bodrossy1 and Andrew Bisset1, (1)CSIRO, Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)Monash University, Water Studies Centre, Clayton, VIC, Australia
Quantifying nitrogen assimilation in the deep ocean: urea is an important nitrogen source for bathypelagic microbial communities (646334)
Nestor Arandia Gorostidi1, Alma Elizabeth Parada2, Alexandra Renee Bausch2 and Anne E Dekas3, (1)Stanford University, Earth System Science, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)Stanford University, Earth System Sciences, Stanford, CA, United States, (3)Stanford University, Earth System Science, Stanford, United States
Factors Controlling Nitrogen Removal and Retention in Marine Sediments (648148)
Rachel Presley1, Anne E Giblin2, Christopher K Algar3, Sean O'Neill1 and Jeremy Joel Rich1, (1)University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences, Orono, ME, United States, (2)Marine Biological Laboratory, Ecosystems Center, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada