OB11B:
Quantifying Carbon Export Pathways in the Global Ocean I

Session ID#: 93169

Session Description:
The ocean's biological pump connects the surface ocean, where light-driven photosynthetic processes fix dissolved carbon dioxide, to the ocean’s twilight zone, where exported carbon is consumed and transformed by a myriad of biological and physical processes as it transits to depth. Three basic pathways are thought to control organic carbon export in the open ocean - gravitational sinking, active migration by metazoans and physical advection and mixing - which are driven by a complicated combination of ecological, biogeochemical and physical oceanographic processes. Developing a predictive understanding of these export pathways and their attenuation with depth is critical for diagnosing present and future rates of ocean carbon sequestration. Recent advances in genomics, in situ particle imaging, remote sensing, geochemistry, autonomous sampling tools, along with recent investments in comprehensive interdisciplinary field programs like EXPORTS, COMICS, GOCART, CUSTARD, and WHOI’s Ocean Twilight Zone makes achieving this goal possible. This session will highlight research that couples ecological, biogeochemical, and physical observations and modeling aimed at improving our understanding and quantification of the ocean’s biological carbon pump.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CT - Chemical Tracers, Organic Matter and Trace Elements
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Controls Over Sinking Particle Remineralisation Depth - Initial Results From the COMICS Programme (645432)
Richard Sanders1,2, Adrian Martin3, Stephanie Henson4, Sari Lou Carolin Giering5, Tom Anderson4, Richard Stephen Lampitt4 and The COMICS Consortium6, (1)Norwegian Research Centre and Bjerknes Climate Change Centre, Climate, Bergen, Norway, (2)National Oceanography Centre, U. K., Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems, Southampton, United Kingdom, (3)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosytems, Southampton, United Kingdom, (4)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (5)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems, Southampton, United Kingdom, (6)COMICS, United Kingdom
Polonium-210 and Lead-210 as tracers of particle export and attenuation on the first EXPORTS cruise at Station PAPA (637688)
Montserrat Roca Martí, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Margaret L Estapa, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, Pere Masque, School of Science, Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia, Claudia R Benitez-Nelson, University of South Carolina, School of the Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Columbia, SC, United States and Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Estimates of Global Carbon Flux Using In-Situ Optical Observations of Particulate Organic Carbon and Supervised Learning (638687)
Daniel Clements1, Simon Yang2 and Daniele Bianchi1, (1)University of California Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)University of California Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, United States
Phytoplankton Community Structure and the Efficiency of the Biological Pump (656566)
Jefferson Keith Moore, University of California Irvine, Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States
MICROBIAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION ON SINKING PARTICLES AS A FUNCTION OF DEPTH AND PARTICLE TYPE IN THE NORTH PACIFIC (655878)
Alyson Santoro1, Justine Albers2, Colleen A Durkin3, Matthieu Bressac4, Margaret L Estapa5, Ken Buesseler6, Melissa Omand7, Uta Passow2 and Philip W. Boyd8, (1)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (4)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Ecology and Biodiversity, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (5)Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, (6)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (7)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (8)Univ Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Role of free-living (or attached to non-sinking suspended particles) versus attached to fast sinking particles heterotrophic prokaryotes in the biological carbon pump at the PAP site (NE Atlantic Ocean) (650687)
Christian Tamburini1, Chloé Baumas2, Marc Garel2, Fabrice Armougom2, Aude Barani2, Sophie Guasco2, Anna Belcher3, Nagib Bhairy2, Christos Panagiotopoulos2, Virginie Riou2, Chiara Santinelli4, Richard Stephen Lampitt5 and Frederic A.C. Le Moigne2, (1)Aix Marseille Univ., Université Toulon, CNRS, IRD, MIO UM 110, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Marseille, France; Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Marseille, France, (2)Aix Marseille Univ., Université Toulon, CNRS, IRD, MIO UM 110, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Marseille, France, Marseille, France, (3)British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (4)CNR Institute of Biophysics, Pisa, Italy, (5)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Bacterial Respiration as a Major Term in the Mesopelagic Carbon Budget (651267)
Rachel Rayne1, Manuela Hartmann2, Chelsey Adrianne Baker1, Sari Lou Carolin Giering3, Richard Sanders3 and Claire Evans3, (1)University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Neuherberg, Germany, (3)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems, Southampton, United Kingdom
Upper Mesopelagic Bacterial Remineralization, an In Situ Perspective Across Diverse Ocean Provinces (649871)
Matthieu Bressac1, Alyson Santoro2, Emmanuel Christian Laurenceau-Cornec1 and Philip W. Boyd3, (1)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Ecology and Biodiversity, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, United States, (3)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Antarctic Climate Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Australia