OB12A:
Quantifying Carbon Export Pathways in the Global Ocean II

Session ID#: 93173

Session Description:
The ocean's biological pump connects the surface ocean, where light-driven photosynthetic processes fix dissolved carbon dioxide, to the ocean’s twilight zone, where exported carbon is consumed and transformed by a myriad of biological and physical processes as it transits to depth. Three basic pathways are thought to control organic carbon export in the open ocean - gravitational sinking, active migration by metazoans and physical advection and mixing - which are driven by a complicated combination of ecological, biogeochemical and physical oceanographic processes. Developing a predictive understanding of these export pathways and their attenuation with depth is critical for diagnosing present and future rates of ocean carbon sequestration. Recent advances in genomics, in situ particle imaging, remote sensing, geochemistry, autonomous sampling tools, along with recent investments in comprehensive interdisciplinary field programs like EXPORTS, COMICS, GOCART, CUSTARD, and WHOI’s Ocean Twilight Zone makes achieving this goal possible. This session will highlight research that couples ecological, biogeochemical, and physical observations and modeling aimed at improving our understanding and quantification of the ocean’s biological carbon pump.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Directly Observing and Quantifying Mechanisms of the Biological Pump Through Particle-resolved Imaging and DNA Sequencing (643916)
Colleen A Durkin, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Alyson Santoro, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, United States, Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States, Margaret L Estapa, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States and Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Evaluation of particle sinking velocities near South Georgia using four independent approaches (650792)
Maria Villa-Alfageme1, Morten H. Iversen2, Nathan Briggs3, Katsiaryna Pabortsava4, Elena Ceballos-Romero1, Feliciano C de Soto5 and Sari Lou Carolin Giering6, (1)Universidad de Sevilla, Applied Physics II, Sevilla, Spain, (2)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany, (3)National Oceanography Center, Southampton, United Kingdom, (4)NOC, Southampton, United Kingdom, (5)Universidad de Pablo Olavide, Sevilla, Spain, (6)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems, Southampton, United Kingdom
Sinking Cells in the Twilight Zone and Their Contribution to Carbon Export (655930)
Anne Bodel, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, United States, Colleen A Durkin, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Margaret L Estapa, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States and Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Particle Flux to Abyssal Depths: Hourly to Seasonal Variability Over an Eight Month Period (October 2014–June 2015) (652035)
Crissy Huffard1, Colleen A Durkin2, Stephanie Wilson3, Paul McGill1, Richard Henthorn1 and Kenneth Smith1, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (3)Bangor University, United Kingdom
The role of mesozooplankton community structure in fecal pellet carbon production in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean (652553)
Karen Stamieszkin, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, United States, Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States and Amy E Maas, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St.George's, Bermuda
Deep zooplankton rely on small particles in response to low fluxes (647960)
Sonia Romero-Romero1, Cassie A. Ka'apu-Lyons2, Blaire Umhau3, Claudia R Benitez-Nelson4, Cecelia C Hannides2, Hilary G Close5, Jeffrey Drazen6 and Brian N Popp7, (1)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Earth Sciences, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)Sea Education Association, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)University of South Carolina, School of the Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Columbia, SC, United States, (5)Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Department of Ocean Sciences, Miami, FL, United States, (6)University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, United States, (7)University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Department of Earth Sciences, Honolulu, HI, United States
Northeast Pacific mesopelagic zooplankton feed increasingly on small (1-51 µm) particles with depth at Station Papa (EXPORTS) (648699)
Connor Shea1, Victor Evrard2, Natalie Wallsgrove2, Tamara Allen2, Joseph S Cope3, Deborah K Steinberg3, Amy E Maas4, Karen Stamieszkin3,5, Hilary G Close6 and Brian N Popp7, (1)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Earth Sciences, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Department of Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (4)Arizona State University, Tempe, United States, (5)Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, United States, (6)University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL, United States, (7)University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Department of Earth Sciences, Honolulu, HI, United States
Development of an agent-based model to assess the role of mesozooplankton community structure and diel vertical migration in fecal pellet carbon flux (652222)
Chandler Elizabeth Countryman, University of Georgia, Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, United States, Adrian Burd, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States and Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States