OM33B:
Inland-Coastal Model Coupling Using a Community-Based Approach I

Session ID#: 93221

Session Description:
Millions of Americans living in coastal areas do not have access to accurate water information such as fresh and saltwater flooding, water quality and water availability for time scales ranging from single events to climatological.  Current hydrodynamic and hydrologic models do not properly represent the complexity of the transition among coastal, estuarine, and riverine processes. Coupling of these models, informed by stakeholder requirements and enhanced by collaborative community research, can help to fill this gap to provide actionable information at local, regional, and national scales. The coupling effort is envisioned to result in a continental-scale capability to inform decisions related to inland and coastal flooding, navigation, emergency hazard response, water quality, and water management. The partnerships and collaborations across disciplinary and geographic boundaries that support inland-coastal model coupling activities will help to advance the development of a community-based modeling approach in support of the NOAA Water Initiative and NOAA's Unified Forecasting framework as well as the needs of other organizations for water information across this geographic region. Inland-coastal coupling is a nexus of atmospheric, coastal, and hydrologic modeling, with connections to subsurface processes, remote sensing, data assimilation, anthropogenic effects, big data, decision support, calibration and parameter estimation, machine learning, model testing, and evaluation. This session welcomes contributions on any of these topics, as well as the facilitation of collaborations, and enhancing community involvement.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
Index Terms:

1902 Community modeling frameworks [INFORMATICS]
4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4235 Estuarine processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4534 Hydrodynamic modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Patrick Burke, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Co-chairs:  Trey Flowers, NOAA Office of Water Prediction, National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, United States, Rick Luettich, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, United States and Ehab Meselhe, Tulane University, Department of River-Coastal Science and Engineering, New Orleans, LA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Patrick Burke, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Moderators:  Patrick Burke, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS, Silver Spring, MD, United States and Trey Flowers, NOAA Office of Water Prediction, National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Patrick Burke, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS, Silver Spring, MD, United States and Trey Flowers, NOAA Office of Water Prediction, National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

A flexible infrastructure for coastal ocean and inland hydrology models coupling (647492)
Saeed Moghimi1,2, Edward Payson Myers III3, Sergey V Vinogradov1, Beheen Trimble4, Yinglong J Zhang5, Fei Ye5, Jaime Calzada6, Andre Jaco Van der Westhuysen7, Yuji Funakoshi1,8, Roham Bakhtyar9, Kazungu Maitaria10, P. Velissariou11, Ali Abdolali7, Daniel Rosen12 and Carsten Lemmen13, (1)NOAA National Ocean Service, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (2)UCAR/NOAA, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (3)NOAA, NOS/OCS, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (4)NOAA-NWC, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (5)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (6)NOAA National Ocean Service, Silver Spring, United States, (7)NOAA Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, MD, United States, (8)University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, MD, United States, (9)NOAA / Office of Water Prediction / National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (10)National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Water Center (NWC), Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (11)NOAA-NOS, Tuscaloosa, United States, (12)Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, United States, (13)Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Geesthacht, Germany
Characterizing Compound Coastal-Riverine Behavior along the U.S. East Coast using a Coupled Hydrologic-Hydrodynamic Model (646141)
Roham Bakhtyar1, Kazungu Maitaria2, P. Velissariou3, Beheen Trimble4, Trey Flowers5, Saeed Moghimi6, Ali Abdolali7, Hassan Mashriqui8, Andre Jaco Van der Westhuysen9, Graeme R Aggett10 and Edward P Clark5, (1)NOAA / Office of Water Prediction / National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (2)National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Water Center (NWC), Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (3)NOAA-NOS, Tuscaloosa, United States, (4)NOAA-NWC, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (5)NOAA Office of Water Prediction, National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, United States, (6)NOAA National Ocean Service, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (7)University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, College Park, MD, United States, (8)National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Silver Spring, United States, (9)NOAA Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, MD, United States, (10)Lynker, Boulder, CO, United States
Coupled hydrological-hydrodynamic large-scale simulation (641592)
Wei Huang1, Yinglong J Zhang1, Fei Ye1, HaoCheng Yu1, Saeed Moghimi2 and Edward Payson Myers III3, (1)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (2)NOAA National Ocean Service, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (3)NOAA, NOS/OCS, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Effect of model setup complexity on hydraulic simulations in low-gradient watersheds: Application in the Vermilion River Basin, south Louisiana. (652619)
Haitham Saad1, Emad H Habib2 and Robert Miller2, (1)University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Department of Civil Engineering, Lafayette, LA, United States, (2)University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Civil Engineering, Lafayette, United States
Integrating WRF Hydro into the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System: Application to Hurricane Florence (2018) (645711)
John C Warner1, Joseph B Zambon2, Ruoying He3, Zafer Defne4 and Christie Hegermiller1, (1)USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)NC State University, Raleigh, NC, United States, (3)North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC, United States, (4)US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Modeling Compound Flooding from Hurricane Florence Using ADCIRC (656871)
Brian O Blanton1, John Ratcliff2, Youcan Feng1 and Rick Luettich3, (1)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Renaissance Computing Institute, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, (2)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, (3)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, United States
Integrated Coastal Urban Flood Modeling, Applications, Lessons Learned, Future Directions (657979)
Thomas C Massey, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, United States, Charles Downer, Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, United States, Nawa Raj Pradhan, Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, United States, Ahmad Tavakoly, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, United States, Drew Loney, US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, United States and Amanda S Tritinger, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL, United States
Networking solutions to data-model coupling at the land-sea interface (644435)
Allison Myers-Pigg1, Nicholas D Ward2, Jerry Tagestad3, James Stegen4, David E Butman5, Charlette Anne Geffen6 and Vanessa Bailey6, (1)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine and Coastal Research Laboratory, Sequim, United States, (2)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Coastal Sciences Division, Sequim, United States, (3)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Earth Systems Science Division, Richland, United States, (4)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, United States, (5)University of Washington, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States, (6)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
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