OB44G:
Planktonic Recorders: Using Tiny Organisms to Understand Past, Present, and Future Oceans II Posters

Session ID#: 93238

Session Description:
Global plankton communities are vital to food web dynamics, ecosystem functioning, and the global cycling of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen. Modern-day ocean acidification, warming, and human activity are impacting plankton communities, leading to shifts in geographic distribution (i.e., biogeography) with ramifications for biogeochemical cycles. A multi-disciplinary approach is required to fully understand marine biogeochemical cycles, from planktonic microbial activities and biomineralization to functional diversity and plankton biogeography. Planktonic calcifiers, in particular, are potentially sensitive bioindicators of both present and past responses of the ocean system to change. The fossil record provides context for these modern-day observations and future predictions with evidence of changes in the plankton community over evolutionary timescales.

We invite contributions that use observations and models to investigate the physiological, chemical, biogeochemical, and physical processes controlling and driving changes in plankton communities in the past, present, or future. Topics may include changes in biogeography, biodiversity, biomineralization, food web dynamics, and/or contributions to biogeochemical cycling and their impacts, from intra-seasonal to interglacial time scales and from the cellular to basin scale. This session aims to bring together biogeochemical, microbial, and paleo oceanographers to detail recent work on better understanding the effects of a changing ocean on these important marine organisms.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Primary Chair:  Natalie M Freeman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom and Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
Primary Liaison:  Natalie M Freeman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Moderators:  Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom and Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Genomic traits and biogeographic pattern reflect adaptation of the Atlantic Ocean microbiome to Nitrogen availability and acquisition (650708)
Meinhard Simon1, Leon Dlugosch1, Anja Poehlein2, Bernd Wemheuer2 and Rolf Daniel2, (1)University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Biology of Geological Processes - Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Oldenburg, Germany, (2)University of Göttingen, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Göttingen, Germany
 
Oxidation of 15N from ammonium, urea and putrescine by bacterioplankton communities in coastal waters off the West Antarctic Peninsula (PAL-LTER) (647130)
James T Hollibaugh1, Brian N Popp2, Natalie Wallsgrove3, Aimee Oyinlade-Oyekan1, Julian Damashek1, Xiaozhen Jen Mou4 and Hugh W Ducklow5, (1)University of Georgia, Department of Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, United States, (2)University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Department of Earth Sciences, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Earth Sciences, Honolulu, HI, United States, (4)Kent State University, Department of Biology, Kent, OH, United States, (5)Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, New York, NY, United States
 
Variability of Total Dissolved Amino Acids in the North Atlantic Ocean Reveal Microbial Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter on Diel to Seasonal Time Scales (652533)
Shuting Liu1, Craig A Carlson1, Nicholas Baetge1, Keri Opalk1, Elisa R Halewood1, Rachel Jane Parsons2 and Rodney Johnson3, (1)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute/Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (2)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St.George's, Bermuda, (3)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda
 
Atlantic and Pacific Ocean bacterioplankton diversity (650951)
Felix Milke1, Selene Sanchez2, Jesse McNichol3, Jed A Fuhrman3, Irene Wagner-Döbler2 and Meinhard Simon4, (1)Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Biology of Geological Processes - Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Oldenburg, Germany, (2)Institute of Microbiology, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany, Germany, (3)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (4)University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Biology of Geological Processes - Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Oldenburg, Germany
 
Biogeochemical Cycling and Metabolic Flexibility in the Lower Oceanic Crust (653576)
Virginia P Edgcomb1, Paraskevi Mara2, Jiangtao Li3, Florence Schubotz4, Gaetan Burgaud5, Jason B Sylvan6, Frieder Klein7, David J. Beaudoin2, Shu Ying Wee8, Maxence Quemener9, Donna K Blackman10 and Lara A.E. Meyer4, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Tongji University, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Shanghai, China, (4)MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (5)Somerville, MA, United States, (6)Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, United States, (7)Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA, United States, (8)Texas A&M University College Station, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, (9)University of Brest, LUBEM (Laboratory of Biodiversity and Microbial Ecology), Plouzané, France, (10)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
 
Linking extracellular enzymes to phylogeny indicates a predominately particle-associated lifestyle of deep-sea prokaryotes (643137)
Zihao Zhao, Federico Baltar and Gerhard J Herndl, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
 
Chemoautotrophy drives plankton activity under the Ross Ice Shelf (650436)
Federico Baltar1, Sergio Morales2, Daniele De Corte3, Christina L Hulbe4, Christian Ohneiser2, Craig L Stevens5, Blair Thomson2, Zihao Zhao1, Chris Greening6, Jose M Gonzalez7, Ramunas Stepanauskas8, Ramiro Logares9, Gerhard J Herndl1 and Clara Martínez-Pérez1, (1)University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria, (2)University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, (3)University of Vienna, Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria, (4)University of Otago, School of Surveying (Dean), Dunedin, New Zealand, (5)NIWA National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, (6)Monash University, VIC, Australia, (7)University of La Laguna, Spain, (8)Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, (9)Institut de Ciencies del Mar, ICM-CSIC, Barcelona, Spain
 
Climate implication for the poleward migration of marine calcifiers (654296)
Amos Winter, Indiana State University, Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, United States, Manfredi Manizza, University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States and Haipeng Zhao, Indiana State University, Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN, United States
 
Contrasting Prochlorococcus temperature niches in the lab and across ocean basins (653042)
Alaina Smith, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, Gwenn Hennon, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Biology and Paleo Environment, Palisades, NY, United States, Erik Zinser, University of Tennessee, Department of Microbiology, Knoxville, TN, United States, Benjamin Carter Calfee, University of Tennessee, Microbiology, Knoxville, TN, United States and Andrew David Barton, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Global marine phytoplankton and zooplankton diversity shifts under climate change. (646485)
Fabio Benedetti, ETH Zurich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, Meike Vogt, ETH Zurich, Environmental Systems Science, Zurich, Switzerland, Nicolas Gruber, ETH Zurich, Environmental Physics, Zurich, Switzerland, Damiano Righetti, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Zurich, Switzerland and Thomas L Froelicher, Princeton Univ, Princeton, NJ, United States
 
Long-time-scale Investigation on the Seasonal Variation of Phytoplankton Size Class Distribution Patterns in the Arabian Sea (651110)
Rebekah Shunmugapandi, Shirish S Gedam and Arun B Inamdar, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Centre of Studies in Resources Engineering, Mumbai, India
 
Phenological pattern of coccolithophore blooms in global shelf regions (657712)
Haipeng Zhao, Indiana State University, Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN, United States and Amos Winter, Indiana State University, Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, United States
 
The Effect of SST Variability on Community Growth Rates and Composition (647943)
Jessica Zaiss1, Philip W. Boyd2, Jon Havenhand3 and Naomi Marcil Levine1, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (3)University of Gothenburg, Department of Marine Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden
 
The global explosion of eukaryotic algae in Cryogenian Oceans: the potential role of phosphorus? (640273)
Lisa Eckford-Soper and Donald E Canfield, University of Southern Denmark, Nordcee, Department of Biology, Odense, Denmark
 
Tropical Pacific-Wide Variability in Vertical Zooplankton and Micronekton Distributions Related to ENSO (657614)
Shirley Leung, Allison Smith-Mislan and LuAnne Thompson, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States
 
Exploring planktonic foraminifera biogeography under changing climate conditions using a global ocean trait-based ecosystem model (648121)
Maria Grigoratou1, Fanny M Monteiro2, Jamie Devereux Wilson3, Andy Ridgwell4 and Daniela N Schmidt3, (1)Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME, United States, (2)University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom, (3)University of Bristol, School of Earth Sciences, Bristol, United Kingdom, (4)University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States
 
Ontogenic vertical migration and lunar reproduction cycle in planktonic foraminifera: myth or reality? (645437)
Julie Meilland, Michael Rojas Siccha Dr. and Michal Kucera, MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
 
The FORCIS project (Foraminifera Response to Climatic Stress: evaluating biodiversity changes of calcifying zooplankton in response to multiple stressors), and Mediterranean context for the response of planktonic foraminifera (650805)
P. Graham Mortyn, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, Thibault de Garidel-Thoron, CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence Cedex, France and Forcis Working Group, French Foundation for Research on Biodiversity (FRB-CESAB), Paris, France
 
Western Mediterranean marine cores show that foraminiferal mass and flux are being influenced by enhanced anthropogenic pressure (652646)
Sven Pallacks1, Griselda Anglada I Ortiz1, Alex Fernandez Espéjo1, P. Graham Mortyn1, Michael Grelaud1, Belen Martrat2, Alessandro Incarbona3, Ralf Schiebel4, Jordi Garcia-Orellana1 and Patrizia Ziveri1,5, (1)Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, (2)Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Barcelona, Spain, (3)University of Palermo, Italy, (4)Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany, (5)ICREA, Barcelona, Spain
 
Morphological Variability of the Deep Dwelling Foraminifer Globorotaloides hexagonus: A clue to changing conditions within the Oxygen Minimum Zone? (651776)
Catherine V Davis, University of South Carolina Columbia, School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment, Columbia, SC, United States, Karen Wishner, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Robert Thunell, Univ South Carolina, Columbia, SC, United States and Pincelli M Hull, Yale University, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, New Haven, CT, United States
 
Stable isotopes of Heliconoides inflatus pteropod shells record near-surface conditions in the Cariaco Basin (650871)
Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom, Catherine V Davis, UC Davis, Petaluma, CA, United States and Jocelyn A Sessa, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Drexel University, Department of Biodiversity Earth and Environmental Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, United States
 
Ocean Acidification, Not Warming, May Reduce Pteropod Abundance in the Mediterranean Sea (653737)
Roberta Johnson, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Barcelona, Spain, Clara Manno, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Patrizia Ziveri, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Barcelona, Spain
 
Population genomics reveals dispersal barriers in the subtropical shelled pteropod Limacina bulimoides (653844)
Le Qin Choo1,2, Marvin Choquet3, Galice Hoarau3, Paula Ramos-Silva1, Erica Goetze4 and Katja Peijnenburg1,2, (1)Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Marine Biodiversity, Leiden, Netherlands, (2)University of Amsterdam, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Amsterdam, Netherlands, (3)Nord University, Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture, Bodø, Norway, (4)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States