OB53A:
Planktonic Recorders: Using Tiny Organisms to Understand Past, Present, and Future Oceans I

Session ID#: 93240

Session Description:
Global plankton communities are vital to food web dynamics, ecosystem functioning, and the global cycling of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen. Modern-day ocean acidification, warming, and human activity are impacting plankton communities, leading to shifts in geographic distribution (i.e., biogeography) with ramifications for biogeochemical cycles. A multi-disciplinary approach is required to fully understand marine biogeochemical cycles, from planktonic microbial activities and biomineralization to functional diversity and plankton biogeography. Planktonic calcifiers, in particular, are potentially sensitive bioindicators of both present and past responses of the ocean system to change. The fossil record provides context for these modern-day observations and future predictions with evidence of changes in the plankton community over evolutionary timescales.

We invite contributions that use observations and models to investigate the physiological, chemical, biogeochemical, and physical processes controlling and driving changes in plankton communities in the past, present, or future. Topics may include changes in biogeography, biodiversity, biomineralization, food web dynamics, and/or contributions to biogeochemical cycling and their impacts, from intra-seasonal to interglacial time scales and from the cellular to basin scale. This session aims to bring together biogeochemical, microbial, and paleo oceanographers to detail recent work on better understanding the effects of a changing ocean on these important marine organisms.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Primary Chair:  Natalie M Freeman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom and Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
Primary Liaison:  Natalie M Freeman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Moderators:  Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom and Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Rosie L Oakes, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Early Cretaceous Origin of Pteropods Suggests Their Resilience to Ocean Acidification (653705)
Katja Peijnenburg1, Arie Janssen2, Deborah Wall-Palmer2, Erica Goetze3, Amy E Maas4, Jonathan A. Todd5 and Ferdinand Marlétaz6, (1)Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Marine Biodiversity, Leiden, Netherlands, (2)Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Netherlands, (3)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (4)Arizona State University, Tempe, United States, (5)Natural History Museum London, United Kingdom, (6)Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan
Using sediment data as pre-industrial baseline for marine zooplankton biogeography: planktonic foraminifera communities now systematically different from before the onset of the Anthropocene (636405)
Lukas Jonkers1, Helmut Hillebrand2 and Michal Kucera1, (1)MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (2)University of Oldenburg, Germany
Resolving the vertical distribution of the pteropod Limacina helicina from a 24-year time series off the coast of British Columbia to estimate experienced ranges in pH and aragonite saturation states (638772)
Matthew R Miller1, Pandora Gibb1, Moira Galbraith2, Debby Ianson3 and John Dower1, (1)University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC, Canada, (2)Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, BC, Canada, (3)Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada,, Sidney, BC, Canada
The role of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus in the biogeochemistry of the oligotrophic oceans (656799)
Susanne Neuer1, Bianca Nahir Cruz1 and Francesca DeMartini2, (1)Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States, (2)Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, United States
A Tropical Tale: Influence of the Warm Blob on the Planktic Foraminifera Community off the Oregon Coast (644446)
M Kelsey Lane, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, Jennifer S Fehrenbacher, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States and Jennifer L. Fisher, Oregon State University, Cooperative Institute of Marine Resources Studies, Newport, OR, United States
Taxonomic, functional and biogeographic traits of the sunlit Atlantic Ocean microbiome (650765)
Leon Dlugosch1, Anja Poehlein2, Bernd Wemheuer2, Thomas H. Badewien3, Rolf Daniel2 and Meinhard Simon1, (1)University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Biology of Geological Processes - Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Oldenburg, Germany, (2)University of Göttingen, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Göttingen, Germany, (3)University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany
Changing Rates and Shifting Ranges: Assessing the Phytoplankton Global Response to Ocean Warming (654410)
Stephanie Anderson1, Andrew David Barton2, Sophie Clayton3, Stephanie Dutkiewicz4 and Tatiana A Rynearson1, (1)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States, (4)Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States
Identifying abrupt biogeographic shifts in a complex model ocean ecosystem (641746)
B. B. Cael1, Stephanie Henson1 and Stephanie Dutkiewicz2, (1)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States