CP34B:
Human Populations and Influences in the Coastal Zone: Effects on Ocean and Human Health (OHH) V Posters

Session ID#: 93317

Session Description:
About 40% of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast generating unprecedented levels of interaction among people, microbial and algal assemblages, and natural and built environments. Population growth and increasing nutrient and pollutant discharges, coupled with increasing ocean temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, acidification, and rising sea levels will only exacerbate impacts of human activities on water quality, coastal ecosystems, aquaculture, fisheries, ecosystem function, and human health. Understanding the interplay of complex ecological, microbiological, biogeochemical, and nearshore oceanographic and hydrologic processes is necessary to mitigate the impact of human influence in the ocean, and determine risks for human health and well-being. Dramatic advances have been made in molecular and genomic methods, biogeochemical processes, and in situ and autonomous sampling and analysis. However, there is need for multi-disciplinary efforts to address linkages across scales, space, and approaches.

This session invites submissions that explore impacts of human activities and climate change on coastal marine and Great Lakes ecosystems, focusing on areas which affect human and animal health (natural and anthropogenic risks), coastal recreational or commercial shellfish harvesting, ocean acidification, nutrient discharge, impacts on aquaculture and ecosystem function, and algal blooms, fish kills, shellfish pathology, and other kinds of wildlife disease. Of particular interest are topics that involve integrated approaches combining cutting edge quantitative techniques, water movement, loading and flux assessments, novel modeling approaches, mechanisms of toxicity, and active stakeholder and community engagement that promotes a broader impact of the science and dissemination of research findings.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4855 Phytoplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Frederick L Tyson, National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences, Genes Environment and Health Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
Co-chairs:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States and Henrietta N Edmonds, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
Moderators:  Henrietta N Edmonds, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States and Frederick L Tyson, National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences, Genes Environment and Health Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States and Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
A persistent benthic Lyngbya wollei bloom in Lake Wateree SC: toxin, inventories, and fates. (654965)
John Ferry1, Meagan L Smith2, Samuel P Putnam2, Tryston Metz2, Timothy J Shaw1 and Geoffrey Scott3, (1)University of South Carolina Columbia, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC, United States, (2)University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC, United States, (3)University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States
 
DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR OCEAN AND HUMAN HEALTH ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH HABS, MICROBES AND CONTAMINANTS OF EMERGING CONCERN (655357)
Geoffrey Scott1, Dwayne E. Porter2,3, George Bullerjahn4, Daniela Friedman3, Heath Kelsey5, Michael Parsons6, Mindy Richlen7, Paul A. Sandifer8, John Stegeman9 and Heather Triezenberg10, (1)University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, (2)University of South Carolina, Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, (3)University of South Carolina, Arnold School of Public Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, (4)Bowling Green State University and and the Great Lakes Center for Fresh Waters and Human Health, Biological Sciences, Bowling Green, OH, United States, (5)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Cambridge, MD, United States, (6)Florida Gulf Coast University and the Greater Caribbean Center for Ciguatera Research, The Water School, Fort Myers, FL, United States, (7)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Center for Oceans and Human Health, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (8)College of Charleston, Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Charleston, SC, United States, (9)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Center for Oceans and Human Health, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (10)Michigan State University and the Great Lakes Center for Fresh Waters and Human Health, East Lansing, MI, United States
 
Elucidating the final step of domoic acid biosynthesis (653773)
Monica Thukral1, Andrew E Allen1,2, Shaun McKinnie3, Bradley S Moore1,4 and Jerome Manera1, (1)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)J. Craig Venter Institute, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, United States, (4)Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Marine and Freshwater Algal Toxins Co-occur at the Land-Sea Interface in Coastal California (655915)
Miranda Roethler, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, Meredith D.A, Howard, Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board, Rancho Cordova, CA, United States, David A Caron, University of Southern California, Biological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, Raphael Martin Kudela, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, United States, Kendra Negrey, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Avery O Tatters, University of California Los Angeles, California NanoSystems Institute, Los Angeles, CA, United States and Jayme Smith, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, United States
 
Nutrient dynamics of emergent Harmful Algal Bloom species of concern in Maryland's coastal ocean waters (653725)
Morgan O Ross1, Jennifer Wolny2, Dylan Taillie3, Catherine Wazniak4 and Judith M O'Neil1, (1)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States, (2)Department of Natural Resources, Annapolis, MD, United States, (3)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Appalachian Laboratory, Frostburg, MD, United States, (4)Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Annnapolis, MD, United States
 
Progress Toward Understanding HAB Climate Response Through Intensive In Situ Observation of Alexandrium catenella (657350)
Michael Brosnahan, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Alexis Dal Fischer, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, David K Ralston, WHOI, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Donald M Anderson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Relationship between microcystin and nutrients during harmful algal blooms in South Florida waterways (653766)
Sabrina Lisa Ufer1, Donna Documet2,3, Mukta Vibhute1, Lilly Blume4, Chaos Burruel1, Kaycie B. Lanpher5, Haley Plaas6, Michael Sheridan7, Chuyan Wan3, Larry E Brand8, Cassandra Gaston9 and Kimberly J. Popendorf5, (1)University of Miami, United States, (2)United States, (3)University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, (4)Cardiff University, United Kingdom, (5)University of Miami, Ocean Sciences, Miami, FL, United States, (6)University of North Carolina, United States, (7)University of Miami, Coral Gables, United States, (8)University of Miami, Marine Biology and Ecology, United States, (9)University of Miami, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, FL, United States
 
Understanding and Regulating Recreation During Cyanobacteria Blooms in a Coastal Urban River: A Case Study from the Charles River, Boston (657372)
Lisa L Kumpf, Charles River Watershed Association, Weston, MA, United States, Max Rome, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States and Tom Faber, Environmental Protection Agency Region 1, North Chelmsford, MA, United States
 
Pseudo-nitzschia in the Indian River Lagoon: an Emerging Threat for Florida (647715)
Stephanie Schreiber1, James M Sullivan2, Malcolm McFarland1, Nicholas Dickens3 and Dennis Hanisak1, (1)Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, FL, United States, (2)Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, FL, United States, (3)Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, United States
 
From research to application: case studies from the University of Southern California (USC) Sea Grant's Urban Ocean Program (647917)
Marika Schulhof, Phyllis M. Grifman and Linda E. Duguay, University of Southern California, Sea Grant Program, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
Microcystin and BMAA toxicity compared to bloom density in South Florida cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (651944)
Donna Documet1, Mukta Vibhute2, Sabrina Lisa Ufer2, Lilly Blume3, Chaos Burruel2, Kaycie B. Lanpher4, Haley Plaas5, Michael Sheridan6, Chuyan Wan7, Larry E Brand8, Cassandra Gaston9 and Kimberly J. Popendorf4, (1)United States, (2)University of Miami, United States, (3)Cardiff University, United Kingdom, (4)University of Miami, Ocean Sciences, Miami, FL, United States, (5)University of North Carolina, United States, (6)University of Miami, Coral Gables, United States, (7)University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, (8)University of Miami, Marine Biology and Ecology, United States, (9)University of Miami, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, FL, United States