AI52A:
Processes Affecting Air-Sea Exchange and the Biogeochemistry of the Upper Ocean II

Session ID#: 93435

Session Description:
Gas, aerosol, and heat exchange processes across the air-sea interface impact global biogeochemical cycles, marine ecosystem dynamics, and atmospheric chemistry. Understanding these exchange processes is therefore critical for the prediction of climate change. Atmospheric deposition of micro- and macro-nutrients, organic matter, and pollutants influence biogeochemical cycling, primary productivity, and biological community composition in the ocean. Emissions of gases and aerosol particles from the sea surface to the atmosphere affect the number and composition of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles with important consequences for understanding clouds and climate. Upper-ocean processes, including the sea surface microlayer and phytoplankton and microbial compositions, are both affected by and influence these exchange processes. The upper ocean with its high and variable incident radiation, turbulence, and physical, chemical, and biological horizontal and vertical gradients must therefore be considered when estimating exchange rates of particles, heat and gases. 

Over the past decade, major field campaigns in chronically under-observed regions, breakthroughs in autonomous platforms and sensors, and innovations in numerical modeling and data analysis techniques have significantly advanced our understanding of the processes and rates of air-sea gas exchange, particularly for carbon dioxide. These advances are helping to improve regional and global model estimates of carbon budgets, and therefore, baseline information for the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. This session invites theoretical, experimental, observational and model studies as well as technological advances for the investigation of upper ocean biogeochemical influences on and consequences of air-sea exchange processes.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CT - Chemical Tracers, Organic Matter and Trace Elements
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4801 Aerosols [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Andrew S Wozniak, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States
Co-chairs:  Mariana Ribas Ribas, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, Alison R Gray, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Jaime B Palter, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
Primary Liaison:  Andrew S Wozniak, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States
Moderators:  Andrew S Wozniak, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States and Mariana Ribas Ribas, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Jaime B Palter, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Oceanic Efflux of Ancient Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon in Primary Marine Aerosol (654714)
Steven R Beaupre1, David J Kieber2, William C Keene3, Michael S Long4, John R Maben3, Xi Lu5, Yuting Zhu6, Amanda A Frossard7, Joanna D. Kinsey8, Patrick Duplessis9, Rachel Chang9 and John Bisgrove10, (1)Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States, (2)SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Department of Chemistry, Syracuse, NY, United States, (3)University of Virginia, Department of Environmental Sciences, Charlottesville, VA, United States, (4)Harvard University, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, United States, (5)Stony Brook University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Stony Brook, NY, United States, (6)Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health, Albany, United States, (7)University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States, (8)Quinnipiac University, NY, United States, (9)Dalhousie University, Physics & Atmospheric Science, Halifax, NS, Canada, (10)State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Department of Chemistry, Syracuse, NY, United States
Properties of Seawater Surfactants Associated with Atmospheric and Primary Marine Aerosol Particles (646156)
Amanda A Frossard1, Tret Burdette2 and Rachel Bramblett2, (1)University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States, (2)University of Georgia, Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States
Ice nucleating particles carried from below a phytoplankton bloom to the Arctic atmosphere (491772)
Jessie Creamean, Colorado State University, Department of Atmospheric Science, Fort Collins, United States and Jessica N Cross, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
Experimental enrichment of the sea surface microlayer from rising bubbles, the duality of breaking waves (654001)
Tiera-Brandy Robinson, Carl-von-Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Insitut für Chemie und Biologie des Meeres, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, Oliver Wurl, Carl-von-Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Institut für Chemie und Biologie des Meeres, Wilhelmshaven, Germany and Helge-Ansgar Giebel, University of Oldenburg, Institute for chemistry and biology of the marine environment, Oldenburg, Germany
Spatiotemporal Variability in the Surface Microlayer of Delaware Bay (646211)
Nicole R R Coffey1, Jessica Irene Czarnecki1, Alina M Ebling2 and Andrew S Wozniak1, (1)University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States, (2)University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Lewes, DE, United States
Enhanced production of dissolved and particulate organic matter in the presence of microplastics at the air-sea interface (578300)
Luisa Galgani1,2 and Steven A. Loiselle1, (1)University of Siena, Biotechnology, Chemistry and Pharmacy, Siena, Italy, (2)CSGI - Center for Colloid and Surface Science, Florence, Italy
Drought-enhanced dust as a driver of decadal changes in Tasman Sea phytoplankton (645564)
Joan Llort, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, Hobart, Australia; Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Earth Sciences Department - Climate Prediction Group, Barcelona, Spain, Richard Matear, CSIRO, Oceans & Atmosphere, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Peter G Strutton, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Andrew R Bowie, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia and Zanna Chase, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Photochemical Production and Biological Consumption of Carbon Monoxide (CO) in the Sea Surface Microlayer of Temperate Coastal Waters: Implications for Air-sea CO Exchange (649045)
Youta Sugai, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Marine Microbiology, Department of Marine Ecosystems Dynamics, Kashiwa, Japan, Kenji Tsuchiya, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Center for Regional Environmental Research, Tsukuba, Japan, Shinji Shimode, Yokohama National University, Graduate School of Environment and Information Sciences, Yokohama, Japan and Tatsuki Toda, Soka University, Graduate School of Engineering, Hachioji, Japan