OM42A:
Lagrangian Methods for Understanding Ocean Circulation and Tracer Transport II eLightning

Session ID#: 93482

Session Description:
Lagrangian analysis, both from drifting instruments and ocean models, provides a complementary view to the Eulerian view of the ocean circulation and tracer dispersion. In recent years, the development of both online and offline, user-friendly and customizable Lagrangian tools applied to ocean circulation models has led to a greater understanding of ocean processes. In this session, we welcome contributions developing and applying Lagrangian methods to understand the past, present and future ocean circulation from all oceanic regions. Examples of applications include ventilation and subduction processes, water mass pathways and timescales, and transport of physical and biogeochemical tracers by ocean circulation and mixing processes. Both contributions presenting scientific results and advancements in Lagrangian analysis methods from observations and modelling are encouraged.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CT - Chemical Tracers, Organic Matter and Trace Elements
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
Index Terms:

4223 Descriptive and regional oceanography [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4255 Numerical modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4532 General circulation [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Veronica Tamsitt, University of New South Wales, Climate Change Research Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Co-chairs:  Isabella Rosso, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Erik van Sebille, Universiteit Utrecht, Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Research, Utrecht, Netherlands
Primary Liaison:  Veronica Tamsitt, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, Saint Petersburg, United States
Moderators:  Veronica Tamsitt, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, Saint Petersburg, United States, Isabella Rosso, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Erik van Sebille, Universiteit Utrecht, Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Research, Utrecht, Netherlands
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Veronica Tamsitt, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, Saint Petersburg, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Simulating Lagrangian particles in the ocean using the Transport Matrix Method (642535)
Samar Khatiwala1, Dave May1, Sean Barrett2, Anna Rufas Blanco1 and Elleanor Lamb3, (1)University of Oxford, Department of Earth Sciences, Oxford, United Kingdom, (2)University of Oxford, Department of Physics, United Kingdom, (3)Imperial College London, United Kingdom
 
Kinetic Theory Formulation and Analysis of Lagrangian Oceanic Particle Trajectories (657214)
Marcio Luiz Vianna, VM Oceanica Ltd, Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil and Viviane V Menezes, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Efficient Bayesian inference for globally defined ocean transport and diffusivity fields (656037)
Yik Keung Ying, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9, United Kingdom, James Roland Maddison, University of Edinburgh, School of Mathematics, Edinburgh, United Kingdom and Jacques Vanneste, University of Edinburgh, Mathematics, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
 
Identification of Hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures in Three-Dimensional Time-Varying Flow (653777)
Tor Nordam1, Arne Magnus Tveita Løken2 and Simon Nordgreen2, (1)SINTEF Ocean, Trondheim, Norway, (2)Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, Norway
 
Lagrangian isopycnal RAFOS floats reveal mixing rates and dynamics in the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic Oxygen Minimum Zone (643256)
Jaime B Palter, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Donald W Rudnickas Jr, U.S. Coast Guard, International Ice Patrol, New London, RI, United States, H. Thomas Rossby, Univ Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States and David Hebert, Department of fisheries and oceans, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS, Canada
 
Abyssal Pathways and the Northeast Pacific Double Silica Maximum (642427)
Susan L Hautala, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA, United States and Douglas E Hammond, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
The North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre Spiral (637748)
Kristofer Döös1, Sara Berglund1, Sjoerd Groeskamp2 and Trevor J McDougall3, (1)Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, (2)Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands, (3)University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
 
Mass exchange of Atlantic Water with the Lofoten Basin derived from high-resolution Lagrangian simulations (650062)
Johannes Dugstad1, Inga Monika Koszalka2, Knut-Frode Dagestad3, Ilker Fer1 and Pål Erik Isachsen4, (1)University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, (2)Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Bergen, Norway, (4)University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
 
A new improved estimation of Agulhas Leakage using observations and simulations of Lagrangian floats and drifters (653754)
Houraa Daher, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States and Lisa M Beal, University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL, United States
 
Cold route versus warm route in the Meridional Overturning Circulation according to ECCO4 (648236)
Louise Rousselet, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, Gael Forget, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States and Paola Cessi, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Tracing the Warming and Salinification Processes in the Conveyor Belt; from the Drake Passage to the Tropics (638049)
Sara Berglund1, Kristofer Döös1 and Jonas Nycander2, (1)Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, (2)Stockholm University, Dept of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden
 
Lagrangian Pathways of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in the Southern Ocean (640529)
Riley Xavier Brady1, Mathew E Maltrud2, Phillip J. Wolfram Jr2 and Nicole S Lovenduski3, (1)University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States, (2)Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States, (3)University of Colorado, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States
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