OB24F:
Quantifying Carbon Export Pathways in the Global Ocean V Posters

Session ID#: 93485

Session Description:
The ocean's biological pump connects the surface ocean, where light-driven photosynthetic processes fix dissolved carbon dioxide, to the ocean’s twilight zone, where exported carbon is consumed and transformed by a myriad of biological and physical processes as it transits to depth. Three basic pathways are thought to control organic carbon export in the open ocean - gravitational sinking, active migration by metazoans and physical advection and mixing - which are driven by a complicated combination of ecological, biogeochemical and physical oceanographic processes. Developing a predictive understanding of these export pathways and their attenuation with depth is critical for diagnosing present and future rates of ocean carbon sequestration. Recent advances in genomics, in situ particle imaging, remote sensing, geochemistry, autonomous sampling tools, along with recent investments in comprehensive interdisciplinary field programs like EXPORTS, COMICS, GOCART, CUSTARD, and WHOI’s Ocean Twilight Zone makes achieving this goal possible. This session will highlight research that couples ecological, biogeochemical, and physical observations and modeling aimed at improving our understanding and quantification of the ocean’s biological carbon pump.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Seasonal Dynamics of Organic Carbon in the Deep Water Column of the Eastern North Pacific (638659)
Chelsi Lopez, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States and Dennis A Hansell, University of Miami, Miami, United States
 
Particulate Organic Matter Composition and Distribution in the Twilight Zone (645805)
Calum Preece, University of Liverpool, Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Konstadinos Kiriakoulakis, Liverpool John Moores University, School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Sabena Blackbird, University of Liverpool, School of Environmental Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom and George A Wolff, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
 
Quantifying Primary Productivity Rates from Coastal to Open Waters in the NE Pacific Ocean: A Contribution to the 2018 EXPORTS Program (647070)
Diana E Varela1, Roberta Claire Hamme2 and Sile Morgaine Kafrissen2, (1)University of Victoria, Department of Biology & School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC, Canada, (2)University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC, Canada
 
The EXport Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) Field Campaign: Results from the Northeast Pacific Deployment and Plans Forward (647587)
David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and The EXPORTS Science Team
 
Improving carbon export estimates through the paired use of autonomous platforms and remote sensing algorithms near Ocean Station Papa (648661)
Jacqueline Long1, Andrea J Fassbender2, William Haskell1 and Margaret L Estapa3, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, United States, (3)Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States
 
Partitioning Particulate Carbon Export into Three Distinct Pathways Using Biogeochemical Argo Floats (649481)
Peter G Strutton1,2, Joan Llort3,4, Leo Lacour5,6 and Philip W. Boyd1, (1)Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (3)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, Hobart, Australia, (4)Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Earth Sciences Department - Climate Prediction Group, Barcelona, Spain, (5)Laboratoire d'océanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), France, (6)Unité Mixte Internationale Takuvik (CNRS / U. Laval), Quebec City, QC, Canada
 
Interannual variations in net community production in the North Pacific Ocean (649935)
Kitack Lee, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang, South Korea and Ji-Young Moon, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang, South Korea
 
Revisiting 45 years of 234Th data: a comprehensive global oceanic database (650622)
Elena Ceballos-Romero1, Ken Buesseler2, Cristina García-Prieto3 and Maria Villa-Alfageme1, (1)Universidad de Sevilla, Applied Physics II, Sevilla, Spain, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)University of Sevilla (USE), Department of Applied Physics II, Sevilla, Spain
 
Updates to the classic small volume (2-4L) 234Th analysis protocol (652010)
Samantha Jade Clevenger, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, United States; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States, Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Claudia R Benitez-Nelson, University of South Carolina, School of the Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Columbia, SC, United States, Jessica Drysdale, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Steven M Pike, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, United States
 
Measuring the size distributions of submicron particles in ocean by tracking the Brownian motion (652423)
Yuanheng Xiong, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, United States and Xiaodong Zhang, University of Southern Mississippi, Marine Science, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
 
Understanding the remote influences of ocean weather on the episodic pulses of particulate organic carbon flux (655917)
Henry Ruhl, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Fred Bahr, MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, William B Hosking, National Oceanography Centre, Southhampton, United Kingdom, Benoit Espinola, University of Southampton, United Kingdom, Mati Kahru, Univ California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, Patrick Daniel, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, United States, Patrick Drake, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Christopher A Edwards, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States