PC23B:
Climate Impacts on Marine Species IV eLightning

Session ID#: 93499

Session Description:
The marine environment is disproportionately impacted by climate
change, as evidenced through increasing water temperature, ocean
acidification, deoxygenation, rising sea levels, shifting circulation
patterns and increased storm activity. We invite presentations that
explore the observed or modeled response of marine organisms to
climate variability or climate change. Recent studies have revealed
climate-mediated declines in some marine species, while others have
shown remarkable resilience to climate change. For example, Arctic sea
ice loss threatens species that rely on ice for habitat such as polar
bears and ringed seals, whereas tuna species that target moderate sea
surface temperatures may experience range expansion. Ecological
impacts can derive from changes in physiology, bioenergetics,
abundance, distribution, habitat, community structure, reproduction,
behavior, and phenology. A wide range of marine organisms will be
considered, including invertebrates, fish, reptiles, mammals, and sea
birds. We also invite presentations that explore climate impacts on
marine fisheries in terms of spatial distribution, changing target
species and/or gear type, or simply the challenges faced by fisheries
management in a changing climate. This session will showcase observed
and predicted responses of marine organisms to climate change and
provide a venue for researchers to contrast climate-driven phenomena
across regions and taxa.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • HE - High Latitude Environments
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
Index Terms:

1616 Climate variability [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Vincent S Saba, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Princeton, NJ, United States, Kristin Liisa Laidre, Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Polar Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States and Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Identifying prey traits to predict for predator diet shifts under climate change in albacore tuna (644887)
Natasha Hardy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, Cindy Matuch, Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, Monterey, CA, United States, Elliott L. Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States, Michael Jacox, University of California-Santa Cruz, San Francisco, CA, United States, Steven J. Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, United States, Larry Crowder, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States and Stephanie Green, University of Alberta, Biological Sciences, Edmonton, AB, Canada
 
Influence of Climate Change on Habitat Utilization of Chesapeake Bay Fishes (638135)
Adena Schonfeld, James Gartland and Robert J. Latour, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
 
The interaction between ocean warming and spawning latitude on U.S. Northeast Shelf black sea bass (Centropristis striata) energetics and reproductive potential throughout the spawning season (638585)
Emily Slesinger, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Piscataway, NJ, United States and Grace Saba, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
 
Depression and recovery of pelagic biomass in response to El Niño events and a warming trend (655239)
Elan Portner1, Kelly Benoit-Bird2, Elliott L. Hazen3, Chad M Waluk2, Carlos Jorge Robinson4, Jaime Gomez-Gutierrez5 and William F Gilly6, (1)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (3)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States, (4)University of Mexico, UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Mexico, DF, Mexico, (5)Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, Plancton y Ecología Marina, La Paz, BS, Mexico, (6)Stanford Univ-Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States
 
Examining surface and subsurface drivers of variability in the distribution of mesopelagic prey through the diet of longnose lancetfish, Alepisaurus ferox (657003)
Julia Chavarry, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Biological Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, Elan Portner, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA, United States, Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States, Jeffrey J Polovina, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, United States, Phoebe A Woodworth-Jefcoats, NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC, Honolulu, HI, United States and Anela Choy, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Integrative Oceanography Division, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Sea urchin reproductive performance in a changing ocean: examining the impacts of climate change and environmental variability on gametes, fertilisation and early development in sea urchins (645428)
Kathryn Smith and Ceri N Lewis, University of Exeter, Department of Biosciences, Geoffrey Pope Building, Exeter, EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
 
Species-specific responses of tropical gastropods to moderate ocean warming (642612)
Laura Falkenberg1, Dina-Leigh Simons1,2 and Kathryn R. Anderson1, (1)The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (2)The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
 
The effects of ocean acidification and parental history on eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) biomineralization and functional morphology (654956)
Elise McNally1, Ffion Titmuss2, Alan Downey-Wall1, Katie Lotterhos1 and Justin B Ries3, (1)Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Boston, United States, (2)Northeastern University, Marine and Environmental Sciences, Boston, United States, (3)Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Nahant, MA, United States
 
Latitudinal Variation in Seagrass Wasting Disease from Puget Sound to Alaska (644172)
Olivia Graham1, Corinne Klohmann2, Sukanya Dayal3, Emily Adamczyk4, Margot Hessing-Lewis5, Angeleen Olson5, Tiffany Stephens6, Nick Tolimieri7, Morgan E. Eisenlord8, Brendan Rappazzo9, Carla Gomes10 and Drew Harvell1, (1)Cornell University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Ithaca, NY, United States, (2)University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States, (4)University of British Columbia, Department of Zoology, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (5)Hakai Research Institute, BC, Canada, (6)Seagrove Kelp Co., Ketchikan, AK, United States, (7)NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, (8)Cornell University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, NY, United States, (9)Cornell University, Computer Science, Ithaca, NY, United States, (10)Cornell University, Department of Computer Science, Ithaca, United States
 
Foraminiferal holobiont thermal tolerance under climate change - Roommates problems or successful collaboration? (652021)
Danna Titelboim, Doron Pinko and Sigal Abramovich, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
 
The combined and individual effects of elevated salinity and temperature on foraminiferal growth. (650317)
Chen Kenigsberg1, Orit Hyams-Kaphzan2, Danna Titelboim1, Sarit Ashckenazi-Polivoda3 and Sigal Abramovich1, (1)Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel, (2)Geological Survey of Israel, Jerusalem, Israel, (3)Dead Sea and Arava Science Center, Masada National Park, Israel