A42F:
Tropospheric Chemistry-Climate-Biosphere Interactions II


Session ID#: 10711

Session Description:
Tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and other short-lived pollutants contribute to climate change on both regional and global scales. Climate change and variability, in turn, impact means and extremes of these pollutants since their transport and chemistry are sensitive to meteorology. We solicit field, lab, space-based and modeling studies that illuminate interactions between tropospheric chemistry and climate or quantify uncertainties in these feedbacks. Sample topics: 1) air quality in a changing climate; 2) direct and indirect effects of short-lived species on climate, including effects mediated by the biosphere; 3) paleo records of atmospheric chemistry; and 4) policy-relevant aspects of chemistry-climate interactions.
Primary Conveners:  Lee T Murray, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY, United States; University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rochester, NY, United States
Conveners:  Jessica L. Neu, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States, Colette L Heald, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cambridge, MA, United States and Dominick V Spracklen, University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, Leeds, United Kingdom
Chairs:  Lee T Murray, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY, United States; University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rochester, NY, United States and Jessica L. Neu, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Lee T Murray, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY, United States; University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rochester, NY, United States
Index Terms:

0315 Biosphere/atmosphere interactions [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
3305 Climate change and variability [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Jordan Schnell and Michael J Prather, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, United States
Eric J Bucsela1, Kenneth E Pickering2, Dale J Allen3, Robert Holzworth4 and Nickolay Anatoly Krotkov2, (1)SRI International Menlo Park, Menlo Park, CA, United States, (2)NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, (3)University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, United States, (4)University of Washington Seattle Campus, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States
Peer Johannes Nowack1, N. Luke Abraham2,3, Amanda C Maycock2,3, Peter Braesicke4 and John Adrian Pyle2,3, (1)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)University of Cambridge, Chemistry, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (4)Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IMK-ASF, Karlsruhe, Germany
Elizabeth A Barnes, Colorado State University Fort Collins, Fort Collins, CO, UNITED STATES and Arlene M Fiore, Columbia University of New York, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palisades, NY, United States
Fernando Garcia Menendez, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Global Change Science, Cambridge, MA, United States, Erwan Monier, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Cambridge, MA, United States and Noelle E Selin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States
Ben Newsome, University of York, Chemistry, York, United Kingdom and Mathew J Evans, Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York, United Kingdom
Kostas Tsigaridis, Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States and Susanne Bauer, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY, United States
Joyce Penner, Guangxing Lin and Cheng Zhou, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, United States