A11R:
Evaluating Reanalysis: What Can We Learn about Past Weather and Climate? I


Session ID#: 10751

Session Description:
Reanalysis is a scientific method for producing a physically complete estimation of the past state and variability of geophysical systems (e.g., atmosphere, ocean). Reanalyses are frequently used as "observations" in assessing the fidelity of model simulations of the recent past, and also in studying short-term variability and long-term change in the system. However, inhomogeneities in the observing system and biases in the numerical models may lead to spurious changes and trends in reanalysis products. These issues can be addressed to some extent by intercomparing different reanalyses, and comparing reanalyses to independent observations. In this light, organized efforts such as the SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) and the EU-funded project UERRA have started to systematically evaluate reanalysis products. The session welcomes contributions on the evaluation and intercomparison of reanalyses, including global, regional, atmospheric, ocean, and coupled reanalyses. In particular, intercomparison of multiple reanalyses and comparisons with independent (non-assimilated) data are encouraged.
Primary Conveners:  Jan Dominik Keller, Deutscher Wetterdienst Nieder, Offenbach, Germany
Conveners:  Sean M Davis, NOAA Boulder, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO, United States, James A Renwick, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand and David H Bromwich, Byrd Polar & Climate Rsrch Ctr, Columbus, OH, United States
Chairs:  Jan Dominik Keller, Deutscher Wetterdienst Nieder, Offenbach, Germany and Sean M Davis, NOAA Boulder, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Jan Dominik Keller, Deutscher Wetterdienst Nieder, Offenbach, Germany

Cross-Listed:
  • GC - Global Environmental Change
  • H - Hydrology
  • NG - Nonlinear Geophysics
  • OS - Ocean Sciences
Index Terms:

1610 Atmosphere [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1616 Climate variability [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1635 Oceans [GLOBAL CHANGE]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Douglas Schuster, Nat'l Ctr for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States and Steven J Worley, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States
Rossana Dragani, Hans Hersbach, Paul Poli, Carole Pebeuy, Shoji Hirahara, Adrian Simmons and Dick Dee, European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, United Kingdom
Piero Lionello and Roberta D'Agostino, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy
Peter Jermey, Met Office (UK), Exeter, United Kingdom
Craig S Long, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Climate Prediction Center, college park, MD, United States, Masatomo Fujiwara, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan and Dann Mitchell, University of Oxford, Physics, Oxford, United Kingdom
Tianbao Zhao1, Juanhuai Wang1 and Aiguo Dai2, (1)Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing, China, (2)University at Albany State University of New York, Albany, NY, United States
Yuki Kanno, Muhammad Rais Abdillah and Toshiki Iwasaki, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Craig R Ferguson, University at Albany State University of New York, Albany, NY, United States and Min-Hee Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South)