A24A:
Advances in Atmospheric Remote Sensing Techniques and Theories III


Session ID#: 10908

Session Description:
Space-borne active and passive remote-sensing techniques and theories for measuring atmospheric compositions have advanced rapidly in recent years. Ground-based and in situ measurements of atmospheric components, such as cloud and aerosol particles, are essential to calibrate and validate satellite data. Fundamental atmospheric physics, such as light scattering and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, is critical for the comprehension of remotely sensed data. This AGU session will tackle all these topics in order to seek the trend and novel developments in the atmospheric remote sensing field. New techniques such as passive spectral and polarimetric measurements of the atmospheric compositions, active instrument detection of aerosols or gases, and latest development in radiative transfer and light scattering modeling are especially welcomed. This session invites the atmospheric remote sensing community to report their results and discuss future directions of atmospheric remote sensing.
Primary Conveners:  Wenbo Sun, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Hampton, Hampton, VA, United States
Conveners:  Kazuaki Kawamoto, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan
Chairs:  Wenbo Sun, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Hampton, Hampton, VA, United States and Kazuaki Kawamoto, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan
OSPA Liaisons:  Kazuaki Kawamoto, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan
Index Terms:

0305 Aerosols and particles [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0319 Cloud optics [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0321 Cloud/radiation interaction [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Wenbo Sun, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Hampton, Hampton, VA, United States
Hajime Okamoto1, Kaori Sato2, Hiroshi Ishimoto3 and Yuichiro Hagihara1, (1)Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, (2)Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Japan, (3)Meteorological Research Institute, Ibaraki, Japan
Quanhua Liu1, Nicholas R Nalli2, Changyi Tan2, Kexin Zhang2, Flavio Iturbide2, Michael Wilson2 and Lihang Zhou3, (1)NOAA College Park, College Park, MD, United States, (2)IMSG, College Park, MD, United States, (3)NOAA, Boulder, CO, United States
Wu Zhang1, Dan Liu1 and Qingyun Zhao2, (1)Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China, (2)Lanzhou Center Meteorological Observatory, Lanzhou, China
Zhenzhu Wang1,2, Dong Liu2 and Chenbo Xie2, (1)CASHIPS Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Hefei, China, (2)Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Composition and Optical Radiation, Chinese Academy of Sciences,, Hefei, Anhui, China
David Newnham, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, George P Ford, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom, Tracy Moffat-Griffin, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Hugh C Pumphrey, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Zhongwei Huang1, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2 and Jianrong Bi1, (1)LZU Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China, (2)National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan
Yongxiang Hu1, David M Winker1, Johnathan W Hair1, Mark Vaughan2, Chris A Hostetler1, SHAN Zeng1, Zhaoyan Liu1, Ali H Omar1, David MacDonnell1, Carolyn F Butler1 and Wenbo Sun3, (1)NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States, (2)Science and Technology Corporation, Boulder, CO, United States, (3)Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Hampton, Hampton, VA, United States