A42C:
Cloud Observations and Uncertainties II


Session ID#: 11010

Session Description:
Clouds play a significant role in Earth’s hydrological cycle and radiation budget. Representation of clouds in climate models remains as one of the largest uncertainties in predictions of future climate. Long-term cloud retrievals with accurate uncertainty estimates are necessary for improving cloud parameterizations within climate models. 

Cloud properties can be retrieved using space- or ground-based remote sensors or directly from in situ aircraft probes. Studies have shown large differences of cloud properties among various methods, raising questions about the assumptions behind them and/or their representativeness. The uncertainties could come from the measurements themselves and retrieval algorithms applied downstream to them. To advance our understanding of clouds and their processes, it is crucial to understand and quantify the uncertainties associated with measurements and retrievals.

This session invites papers on cloud property 1) measurements or retrievals, 2) uncertainty analyses, and 3) implementation of realistic uncertainties on the measurements and retrievals.

Primary Conveners:  Chuanfeng Zhao, Beijing Normal University, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing, China
Conveners:  Xiquan Dong, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, United States, Derek J Posselt, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, United States and Jonathan H. Jiang, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Chairs:  Chuanfeng Zhao, Beijing Normal University, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing, China and Xiquan Dong, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Chuanfeng Zhao, Beijing Normal University, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing, China

Cross-Listed:
  • GC - Global Environmental Change
Index Terms:

0320 Cloud physics and chemistry [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0321 Cloud/radiation interaction [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
1640 Remote sensing [GLOBAL CHANGE]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Gerald G Mace, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Andrew Heymsfield, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States, Aaron Bansemer, NCAR, Boulder, CO, United States, Simone Tanelli, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States and Michael Poellot, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, United States
Andrew Heymsfield, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States and Aaron Bansemer, NCAR, Boulder, CO, United States
Jingjing Tian1, Xiquan Dong1, Baike Xi1, Jingyu Wang1 and Cameron R Homeyer2, (1)University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, United States, (2)University of Oklahoma, School of Meteorology, Norman, OK, United States
Jeana Mascio and Gerald G Mace, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Simone Lolli1, Belay Demoz2, Paolo Di Girolamo3 and Ellsworth Judd Welton1, (1)NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, (2)University of Maryland Baltimore County, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), Baltimore, MD, United States, (3)Università della basilicata, POTENZA, Italy
Hironobu Iwabuchi1, Yuka Tokoro1, Masanori Saito1, Nurfiena Sagita Putri1, Shuichiro Katagiri1 and Miho Sekiguchi2, (1)Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, (2)Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan
Thomas Kuhn, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden and Andrew Heymsfield, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States