A23K:
Improved Understanding of the Surface Energy Balance and the Spatiotemporal Variation of Its Components I


Session ID#: 11018

Session Description:
The surface radiative energy budget is a key determinant in the climate system. As such, it is imperative that this budget and the influences on the budget be understood and well documented. We invite papers on all aspects of the global and regional surface energy budgets based on surface measurements, satellite-derived estimates, reanalysis products, and climate model simulations. Emphasis is placed on all aspects of field measurements of atmospheric radiation and non-radiative components (e.g., latent and sensible heat fluxes) including spatial and temporal variations. Related studies based on changes in the cloud and aerosol forcing are also welcome. Special attention will be given to papers dealing with the solar dimming/brightening phenomenon. As well, papers that use validated proxy data to spatially and temporally extend our knowledge on the variations in some of the surface energy components (e.g., sunshine duration, pan evaporation, visibility or tree-rings) are encouraged.
Primary Conveners:  Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo, IPE-CSIC, Zaragoza, Spain
Conveners:  Martin Wild, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, Paul W Stackhouse Jr, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States and Charles N. Long, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States; NOAA OAR ESRL, Boulder, CO, United States
Chairs:  Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo, IPE-CSIC, Zaragoza, Spain and Paul W Stackhouse Jr, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo, IPE-CSIC, Zaragoza, Spain

Cross-Listed:
  • B - Biogeosciences
  • GC - Global Environmental Change
Index Terms:

0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
1694 Instruments and techniques [GLOBAL CHANGE]
3311 Clouds and aerosols [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]
3359 Radiative processes [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Kevin E Trenberth, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States
V Ramaswamy, NOAA GFDL, Director's Office, Princeton, NJ, United States, Yi Ming, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States and M Daniel Schwarzkopf, NOAA GFDL, Princeton, NJ, United States
Martin Wild1, Maria Zita Hakuba1, Doris Folini1 and Charles N. Long2, (1)ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, (2)Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States
Charles N. Long, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States, Connor Joseph Flynn, PNNL, Richland, VA, United States and Jim Barnard, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV, United States
Chris W Fairall, NOAA ESRL, Boulder, CO, United States and Byron Blomquist, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States
Thomas P Ackerman, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA, United States, Laura M Hinkelman, Univ of WA-JISAO, Seattle, WA, United States and Nevin Schaeffer, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA, United States
Rolf Philipona, MeteoSwiss Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology, Zurich, Switzerland, Andreas Kraeuchi, ETH Zurich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland and Rigel Kivi, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Meteorological Institute, Arctic Research, 99600 Sodankylä, Finland
Kaicun Wang, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China