ED13C:
Climate Literacy: Climate Education and Outreach Utilizing Ocean Observations Posters


Session ID#: 8858

Session Description:
Many education and public outreach (EPO) efforts focus on climate literacy, aimed at helping individuals and communities understand Earth’s climate and impacts of climate change. A principle of climate literacy is that the ocean exerts major control on climate by dominating Earth’s energy and water cycles. Key resources, then, for EPO efforts around climate education, are the available ocean climate data and products from platforms like the drifting buoy, Argo, satellites, and buoy arrays that provide fundamental observations that contribute towards climate understanding, predictions, and projections. Integrating these into climate EPO efforts can engage students and the public around innovative technology, communicate core principles of scientific observing, and underscore the importance of the global ocean to climate science and society. We invite presentations on all aspects of ocean climate communication, including formal and informal EPO activities that use ocean observations, and outreach efforts around ocean observing systems and scientific projects.
Primary Convener:  Emily A. Smith, NOAA Washington DC, Washington, DC, United States; NOAA Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Conveners:  Jennifer Saleem Arrigo1,2, Diane Stanitski3 and Emily A. Smith1,2, (1)NOAA Washington DC, Washington, DC, United States(2)NOAA Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD, United States(3)NOAA, ESRL Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, CO, United States
Chairs:  Emily A. Smith, NOAA Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD, United States; NOAA Washington DC, Washington, DC, United States and Jennifer Saleem Arrigo, NOAA, ESRL Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, CO, United States; NOAA Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD, United States
OSPA Liaison:  Emily A. Smith, NOAA Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD, United States; NOAA Washington DC, Washington, DC, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • OS - Ocean Sciences

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Oscar Schofield, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
Ruth Krumhansl1, Randall E Kochevar1, Lihini Aluwihare2, Erin Weeks Bardar1, Linda Hirsch1, Craig Hoyle1, Kira Krumhansl1, Josephine Louie1, John Madura1, Julianne Mueller-Northcott1, Cheryl L Peach3, Alan Trujillo4, Brad Winney1, Virgil Zetterlind1 and Amy Busey1, (1)Oceans of Data Institute, Education Development Center, Inc., Waltham, MA, United States, (2)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Palomar College, San Marcos, CA, United States
Maia Hoeberechts1, Jessica Brown2, Mercedes Alexandra McLean1, Natasha Ewing1, Monika Pelz1 and Kate Moran1, (1)Ocean Networks Canada, Victoria, BC, Canada, (2)Ocean Networks Canada, University of Victoria, User Services - Learning and Engagement, Victoria, BC, Canada
Jennifer Saleem Arrigo, NOAA Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Jacquelyn E Hams, Los Angeles Valley College, Earth Science, Valley Glen, CA, United States
David M Anderson1, Debra Lee Hernandez2, Abbey Wakely2, Robert J Bochenek3 and Aric Bickel4, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association. SECOORA, Charleston, SC, United States, (3)Axiom Data Science LLC, Anchorage, AK, United States, (4)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Watsonville, CA, United States

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