ME14B:
Advances in the Ecology, Behavior, Physiology, or Conservation of Marine Top Predators III Posters


Session ID#: 9588

Session Description:
Top predators are a vital part of the marine ecosystem, and as such, their ecology, behavior and physiology can influence important processes such as trophic interactions, carbon flow, and nutrient recycling.  Virtually all top predators have a history of over-exploitation or they have special management status because of their sensitivity to marine industrial activities and other human uses (e.g., bycatch, shipping, resource exploration/extraction).  Basic research on top predators often focuses on gaps in our understanding of their ecology, but unlike many other branches of biological oceanography, research can also be motivated directly by management and conservation needs.  This session will focus on studies of the ecology, behavior, and physiology of marine top predators that either advance our scientific understanding or support the conservation of these important taxa.  Because Ocean Sciences provides a unique forum for marine ecologists, marine biologists, and oceanographers to interact, we seek contributions from researchers studying a wide variety of taxa, including fish, squid, reptiles, seabirds, and marine mammals, from anywhere in the world’s oceans.
Primary Chairs:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Chairs:  Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States and Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
Index Terms:

4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • HI - Human Use and Impacts
  • O - Other

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Integration of oceanographic data with fin whale calling presence in the Bering Sea (88414)
Srishti Dasarathy1,2, Catherine Berchok3, Phyllis J Stabeno4 and Jessica Crance3, (1)NOAA NMML, NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholar, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, (2)The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)NOAA NMML, (4)NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
 
Are whale prey euphausiids associated with steep bathymetric features in the California Current Ecosystem? (90685)
Catherine F Nickels, University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Factors Impacting the Migration Paths of Humpback Whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, in Queensland, Australia (90848)
Charles J Lemckert1, Joshua Reinke2 and Olaf Meynecke2, (1)Griffith University, Griffith School of Engineering, Nathan, QLD, Australia, (2)Griffith University, Griffith School of Engineering, Nathan, Australia
 
Description of the Marine Traffic inside the Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals: Key Information for Conservation Policy. (91926)
Aurelie Moulins1, Massimo D'incà2,3, Massimiliano Rosso1, Paola Tepsich1,2 and Frazer Guy Coomber1, (1)CIMA Research Foundation, Savona, Italy, (2)University of Genoa, DIBRIS, Genoa, Italy, (3)Logness srl, Savona, Italy
 
Observed foraging behaviour of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the northwest Atlantic (93652)
Tara Sierra Stevens1, Jack W Lawson2 and Robert Kenney1, (1)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Marine Mammal Section, St. John's, NF, Canada
 
An Example of Comprehensive Research on Little-Known Cetaceans: The Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) in the Eastern Gulf of Thailand (93747)
Justine Jackson-Ricketts, University of California Santa Cruz, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Ellen Hines, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, United States, Rocio I. Ruiz-Cooley, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Daniel P Costa, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
 
ANALYSIS OF THYRRENIAN SEAMOUNTS ATTRACTIVENESS ON STRIPED DOLPHIN AND SEATURTLE.C. Fiori1,2, J. Alessi1, A. Mandich1, C. Paoli1, P. Vassallo1 (1) University of Genoa, DISTAV; C.so Europa 26 16132 Genoa (2) MENKAB: il respiro del mare; Lungomare Matteotti 17100 Savona *cristina.fiori@unige.it (91163)
Cristina Fiori, UNIVERSITY OF GENOA, DISTAV, GENOA, Italy
 
Marine mammal distribution in the open ocean: a comparison of ocean color data products and levant time scales (93847)
Julia Ohern, Self Employed, Washington, DC, United States
 
Satellite tagging, remote sensing, and autonomous vehicles reveal interactions between physiology and environment in a North Pacific top marine predator species (92835)
Noel Pelland1,2, Jeremy Sterling2, Alan Springer3, Sara Iverson4, Devin Johnson2, Mary-Anne Lea5, Nicholas A Bond6, Rolf Ream2, Craig Lee7 and Charles Eriksen1, (1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States, (4)Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, (6)NOAA/PMEL/JISAO, Seattle, WA, United States, (7)University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
 
It’s in Their Bones: 2000 Years of Pacific Walrus Adaptability and Resilience (92646)
Nicole Misarti1, Lara Horstmann1, Casey T. Clark1, Patrick Charapata1, Link Olson1, Tara L Fulton1 and Anne M. Jensen2, (1)University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States, (2)UIC Science
 
Aspects of the Physiology and Behavior of an Endothermic Fish, the Opah, Lampris guttatus. (86832)
Alex Wright, Intern, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA, United States; Student, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States, John Hyde, Supervisory Fishery Research Biologist, Fisheries Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States and Nicholas Wegner, Fisheries Research Biologist, Fisheries Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Relationships between mercury concentration and food selectivity of many kinds of fishes in Minamata Bay (89359)
Keisuke Mori, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Department of Environmental Science and Epidemiology, Minamata, Japan and Gen Kanaya, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Center for Regional Environmental Research, Tsukuba City, Japan
 
Trophic Ecology and Movement Patters of Tiger Sharks (Galeocerdo Cuvier) off the Western North Atlantic Coastal and Continental Shelf Waters (89794)
Gorka Sancho1, Robert Edman2, Bryan Frazier3 and Walter Bubley3, (1)College of Charleston, Department of Biology - Grice Marine Laboratory, Charleston, SC, United States, (2)College of Charleston, Graduate Program in Marine Biology, Charleston, SC, United States, (3)South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Marine Resources Division, Charleston, SC, United States
 
Spatiotemporal & Ecological Processes Associated With Goliath Grouper Aggregations in Southeastern Florida (90229)
Benjamin Michael Binder and Kevin M Boswell, Florida International University, Department of Biological Sciences, North Miami, FL, United States
 
Otolith chemistry discriminates natal signatures of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in the Atlantic Ocean (92449)
Larissa Leigh Kitchens and Jay R Rooker, Texas A&M University, Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Galveston, TX, United States
See more of: Marine Ecosystems