PO006:
Understanding the differing roles of ocean ventilation and mixing on heat and carbon uptake


Session ID#: 28523

Session Description:
Ocean uptake of both heat and carbon play a key role in modulating the natural earth system response to anthropogenic CO2emissions. Both heat and carbon are diffused across the air-sea boundary, but their behavior is different in the ocean interior. Heat can be thought of as an “active tracer” and changes in temperature and associated gradients have direct feedbacks on ocean circulation. Carbon, however, can be thought of more as a “passive tracer” as its physical impacts are often integrated through biogeochemical processes. Ocean ventilation and diapycnal mixing play a key role in redistributing heat and carbon throughout the global ocean and have potentially different impacts on heat and carbon.

This session aims to highlight the sensitivity of heat and carbon uptake to varying mixing processes in ocean models. We seek submissions spanning a wide range of processes and temporal scales - from seasonal to millennial scale. Works focusing on applications of heat and carbon uptake related to climate sensitivity -- e.g. the Transient Climate Response to cumulative carbon Emissions (TCRE) -- are also encouraged.

Primary Chair:  John P Krasting, NOAA / Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States
Co-chairs:  Michael Winton, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States; NOAA / Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States, Ric Williams, Liverpool University, School of Environmental Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom and Kirsten Zickfeld, Simon Fraser University, Department of Geography, Burnaby, BC, Canada
Index Terms:

4255 Numerical modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4568 Turbulence, diffusion, and mixing processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
Cross-Topics:
  • AI - Air-Sea Interactions
  • BN - Biogeochemistry and Nutrients
  • OM - Ocean Modeling

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Anna Katavouta, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Ric Williams, Liverpool University, School of Environmental Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom and Philip Goodwin, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO14, United Kingdom
Sjoerd Groeskamp, University of New South Wales, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Sydney, Australia, Ryan Abernathey, Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States and Andreas Klocker, Research Fellow, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Tasmania, Australia
Katherine Elise Turner, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Ric Williams, Liverpool University, School of Environmental Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom and Andreas Oschlies, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Maria Fernanda Aristizabal, Trinnovim, New York, NY, United States and Anastasia Romanou, Columbia University of New York, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, New York, NY, United States
Dana Ehlert, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany and Kirsten Zickfeld, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada
Thomas L Froelicher, Universtity of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics, Bern, Switzerland, Mathias Aschwanden, University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics, Bern, Switzerland, Sam Jaccard, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland and David Paynter, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States
Paul James Durack1, Peter J Gleckler1 and Eric Guilyardi2, (1)Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, United States, (2)LOCEAN-IPSL, Paris, France