EP009:
Open ocean biological-physical interactions in the Eastern North Pacific from low to mid latitudes through in situ observations, satellite data and models


Session ID#: 28686

Session Description:
The Eastern North Pacific is an area where biological systems are impacted by a variety of physical processes at spatial scales ranging from sub-mesoscale through basin-scale. At low latitudes, the East Pacific includes the high nutrient low chlorophyll region of the cold tongue where mechanisms linked to shifts in biological production range from short-term turbulent mixing to periodic oscillations (e.g. ENSO). Meanwhile, the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) is somewhat of an enigma as an oligotrophic region with low nutrient levels that nonetheless supports dramatic summer phytoplankton blooms as well as the White Shark Cafe, where otherwise coastal great white sharks tend to congregate in winter and spring for reasons not yet understood. The recent advances in systems that observe biological variables (e.g. Bio-Argo floats) combined with two decades of global measurements from ocean color satellites and in-situ measurements, such as from the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOTS) program, provide an opportunity to explore this subject with more assets than ever before. This session will explore links between physical signals and biological variability in the Eastern North Pacific from low to mid latitudes with implications for long-term changes and regime shifts in biology.
Primary Chair:  Stephanie Schollaert Uz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States
Co-Chair:  Cara Wilson, NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Monterey, CA, United States
Index Terms:

4215 Climate and interannual variability [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4572 Upper ocean and mixed layer processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
9355 Pacific Ocean [GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION]
Cross-Topics:
  • F - Fisheries
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PO - Physical Oceanography: Other

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Tracy A Villareal, University of Texas - Marine Science Institute, Port Aransas, TX, United States, Emily Elizabeth Anderson, University of Texas at Austin, Marine Science, Port Aransas, TX, United States, Cara Wilson, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Monterey, CA, United States and Lionel Guidi, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche-sur-Mer, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France
Laura Lilly, California Current Ecosystem Long-Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) Program, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, United States and Mark D Ohman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, United States
Carrie Wall, CIRES, Boulder, CO, United States and Kristopher B Karnauskas, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States
Cara Wilson, NOAA, Boulder, CO, United States
Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, RI, United States, Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, Colleen A Durkin, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Margaret L Estapa, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States and Zrinka Ljubešić, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Zagreb, Croatia
Stephanie Schollaert Uz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, Antonio J Busalacchi, President, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States, Thomas M Smith, NOAA, Boulder, CO, United States, Christopher Brown, NOAA, Center for Satellite Applications and Research, College Park, MD, United States, Eric C Hackert, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, COLLEGE PARK, MD, United States and Xiujun Wang, Beijing Normal University, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing, China