CP53D:
Coastal Research Related to Hurricane Dorian and the 2019 Hurricane Season II eLightning

Session ID#: 100283

Session Description:
Hurricane Dorian, which was the first major hurricane (and fourth named storm) of the 2019 Atlantic storm season, had a major impact throughout the Bahamas and along the East Coast. It made landfall in the Abaco islands as a Category 5 on 1 September 2019  with maximum sustained winds of 295 km/hr and pressure of 911 mb, tying for the highest winds at landfall for an Atlantic hurricane. In the Bahamas, catastrophic damage from winds, rain, and storm surge resulted in more than 50 deaths and more than 1300 people may be missing.  The hurricane skated along the East Coast leading to evacuation orders throughout Florida and the Carolinas. Severe flooding and breaches occurred on the barrier islands of North Carolina between Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout as the storm made landfall as a Category 1 on 6 September 2019.  Dorian even battered the coast of Nova Scotia with hurricane force winds as an extratropical cyclone on 8 September. This session seeks contributions focusing on the coastal impact and processes associated with Dorian and other storms from the 2019 hurricane season, including oceanographic, atmospheric, geomorphologic, hydrologic, ecologic, and climatic factors; data collection methods and assimilation techniques; remote sensing; impacts on the coastal physical environment and human health; and policy implications.  Submissions are welcomed that may be observational or modeling in nature.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • MG - Marine Geology and Sedimentology
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Primary Chair:  Arthur C Trembanis, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States
Co-chairs:  Katherine L Brodie, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Field Research Facility, Duck, NC, United States and Britt Raubenheimer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, United States
Moderators:  Arthur C Trembanis, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States, Katherine L Brodie, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Field Research Facility, Duck, NC, United States and Britt Raubenheimer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Freshening Along the US East Coast by Hurricane Dorian Captured by the SMOS Satellite (659656)
Alberto M Mestas-Nunez1, Rodolfo Fernandez1, Karen Mendiondo2 and Christian Sustayta2, (1)University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, United States, (2)University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, San Antonio, United States
 
Attributing changes in Hurricane Dorian’s hazards to climate change (659447)
Kevin A Reed, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook, United States, Michael F Wehner, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States, Alyssa M Stansfield, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Stony Brook, NY, United States and Colin M. Zarzycki, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, University Park, United States
 
Large-Scale Storm Tide Modeling in the U.S. East Coast and the Bahamas during Hurricane Dorian, 2019 (659366)
Zhuo Liu1, Shabaz Patel1 and Nicole Hu2, (1)One Concern, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, United States, (2)One Concern, Inc., Menlo Park, United States
 
Drivers of Coastal Flooding along South-Atlantic Bight during Hurricanes Dorian and Matthew (659503)
Kyungmin Park, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ocean Science and Engineering, Atlanta, United States, Emanuele Di Lorenzo, Georgia Inst Tech, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA, United States, Kim M Cobb, Georgia Institute of Technology, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA, United States, Russell J Clark, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, United States, Ivan Federico, CMCC - EuroMediterranean Center on Climate Change, Lecce, Italy, Nadia Pinardi, University of Bologna, Physics, Bologna, Italy, Giovanni Coppini, Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change, Ocean Predictions and Applications, Lecce, Italy, Nick Deffley, City of Savannah Government, Savannah, GA, United States, Randall Mathews, Chatham Emergency Management Agency, Savannah, GA, United States, Christopher G Piecuch, Atmospheric and Environmental Research Lexington, Lexington, MA, United States and Tal Ezer, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States
 
Morphologic changes from sound-side inundation of North Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina, USA during Hurricane Dorian (659603)
Christopher R Sherwood, USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Jenna A Brown, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St Petersburg, FL, United States, Christine Kranenburg, USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St Petersburg, FL, United States, Andy Ritchie, U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Jonathan A Warrick, U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, C. Wayne Wright, C. W. Wright Consulting, Tampa, FL, United States and Sara L Zeigler, USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, United States
 
Managing US National Park Service Resources on Barrier Islands in Action: Cape Lookout and Cape Hatteras National Seashores after Hurricane Dorian (659618)
Rebecca Lenel Beavers1, Robert S Young2, Katie McDowell Peek3, Blair Tormey3, Henry T. Crawford4, Margo Schwadron5, Tim Smith6, Mark Ford7, David Hallac8 and Jeffrey West9, (1)National Park Service Denver Service Center, Denver, CO, United States, (2)Western Carolina Univ, Cullowhee, NC, United States, (3)Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, United States, (4)Environmental Stewards, Lakewood, United States, (5)National Park Service, Tallahassee, United States, (6)National Park Service, Lakewood, United States, (7)National Park Service, Baton Rouge, United States, (8)National Park Service, Manteo, United States, (9)National Park Service, Harkers Island, United States
 
Geotechnical Investigation of the Intertidal Zone in Duck, North Carolina, during Tropical Storm Melissa and DUNEX (659311)
Reem Jaber1, Matthew Florence1, Nick Brilli1, Julie Paprocki1, Jack Popelka1 and Nina Stark2, (1)Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, United States, (2)Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, United States