CT24A:
Ocean Ventilation: Results and Innovations from Transient and Deliberate Tracers Posters

Session ID#: 84750

Session Description:
For more than 5 decades, observations of transient tracers have regularly been used to assess ocean ventilation, i.e. the time-scales at which there is exchange of properties between the atmosphere and the interior ocean. These observations have resulted in significantly increased knowledge of the ocean - for instance, constraining transport time-scales for major ventilation pathways and inventories of derived properties, such as anthropogenic carbon, and providing insight on the temporal variability of ventilation. In addition, the use of deliberately released tracers has had significant impact on the understanding of interior ocean mixing rates and advective pathways. For decades, several techniques traditionally have been used for observing tracers. Recently, a number of efforts to refine the analytical techniques - for more accurate or frequent observations of an expanding range of tracers - have been conducted in parallel to traditional observing efforts. It is timely to take stock of recent innovations and to highlight results of tracer oceanography. In this session, we welcome abstracts on results based on observations and/or modelling of transient, or deliberately released, tracers. We also welcome abstracts that address technical innovation in tracer oceanography.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
  • PS - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Smaller
Index Terms:

4532 General circulation [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4536 Hydrography and tracers [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4808 Chemical tracers [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Toste S Tanhua, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Co-chairs:  Douglas Wallace, Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada, Mark J Warner, Univ Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Rana A Fine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
Primary Liaison:  Toste S Tanhua, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany
Moderators:  Toste S Tanhua, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany and Douglas Wallace, Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Toste S Tanhua, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Changes in ventilation and anthropogenic carbon in the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean (650187)
Emil Jeansson1, Balamuralli Rajasakaren1, Toste S Tanhua2, Are Olsen3,4 and William M Smethie Jr5, (1)NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway, (2)Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany, (3)University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen, Norway, (4)Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway, (5)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States
 
Changing ventilation of the Mediterranean Sea studies with a suite of novel halogenated transient tracers (641452)
Pingyang Li and Toste S Tanhua, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany
 
Comparison of Tritium/3He and SF6 Apparent Ages as Water Mass Dating Tools in the Switchyard Region of the Arctic Ocean (649457)
Dongping Song1, Peter Schlosser2, Robert Newton3,4 and William M Smethie Jr3, (1)Columbia University of New York, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Palisades, NY, United States, (2)Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States, (3)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, (4)Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States
 
Contrasts in Oxygen Variability of SE Pacific Oxygen Deficient Zone and Subtropical Gyre (653271)
Molly Martin, Rana A Fine and James D Happell, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
 
Harnessing of the Transients of Anthropogenic Halogenated Compounds for Understanding Ocean Processes: Critical Steps, Lessons Learned and Ways Forward (655766)
Douglas Wallace, Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada, Rana A Fine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, Richard H Gammon, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Monika Rhein, Univ Bremen, FB1, Bremen, Germany, William M Smethie Jr, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, Toste S Tanhua, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany, Mark J Warner, Univ Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Ray F Weiss, Univ California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Investigating Changes in Southern Ocean Circulation through the Use of Transient Tracers (648294)
Genevieve Hinde1, Marie-Jose Messias1, Michael Paul Meredith2, David Roy Munday3 and Paul Richard Halloran4, (1)University of Exeter, Geography, Exeter, United Kingdom, (2)NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Univ Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, (4)Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter, United Kingdom
 
Is There a Bigger Place for 129I in the Oceanographer’s Transient Tracer Toolkit? (654677)
Thomas P Guilderson1, Scott J Tumey1, Thomas A Brown1 and Sabine Mecking2, (1)Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Livermore, CA, United States, (2)Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Seattle, WA, United States
 
Mapping the decadal evolution of Antarctic Bottom Water ventilation from CFCs (651511)
Geoffrey Gebbie, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Sarah G Purkey, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States
 
Recent Dissolved Oxygen Changes in the World Ocean (639084)
James H Swift, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Ayush Agrawal, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, United States
 
Recent Tracer Measurements in the Antarctic Bottom Waters of the Australian-Antarctic Basin (647286)
Mark J Warner, University of Washington Seattle Campus, Seattle, WA, United States, Rolf E Sonnerup, University of Washington, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA, United States, Stephen R Rintoul, Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), Hobart, Australia and Alison M Macdonald, WHOI, Woods Hole, United States
 
Towards Autonomous Observing Platforms for Use in Ocean Tracer Release Experiments (657657)
John Christopher L'Esperance, Dalhousie University, Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada, Toste S Tanhua, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany and Douglas Wallace, Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada
 
Towards large-scale application of 39Ar in ocean circulation studies (642318)
Wei Jiang1,2, A-Min Tong2, Ji-Qiang Gu2, Xi-Ze Dong2, Shui-Ming Hu1,2, Zheng-Tian Lu1,2, Florian Ritterbusch1,2 and Guo-Min Yang1,3, (1)Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, Hefei, China, (2)University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, CAS Center for Excellence in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, Hefei, China, (3)University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), Hefei, China
 
Tracing nutrients released from anoxic sediments with a Tracer Release Experiment - POSTRE (651048)
Toste S Tanhua, Martin Visbeck and Madeleine Freund, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
 
Understanding Circulation Processes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic Regions Using a Combination of Anthropogenic Chemical Tracers (652744)
Nuria Casacuberta1, John Smith2, Anne-Marie Wefing3, Maxi Castrillejo3, Marcus Christl4, Elena Chamizo Calvo5, Mercedes Lopez-Lora5 and William M Smethie Jr6, (1)ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, (2)Bedford Institute of Oceanography, NS, Canada, (3)ETH Zurich, Switzerland, (4)ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Zurich, Switzerland, (5)Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Spain, (6)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States