CP24E:
Regional to Global Monitoring of Coral Reef Ecosystems Posters

Session ID#: 85274

Session Description:
Coral reefs and associated coastal ecosystems are among the most vulnerable and productive in the world. Coral reefs are under immediate threat from climate change, coastal development, pollution, and overfishing. Although the overall extent of reefs is relatively consistent, the accuracy of our global scale knowledge of shallow reef extent remains in question, and the extent of deeper reefs is even less understood.  Additionally, reef composition, including live coral, dead/bleaching coral, and macroalgal cover, is changing fast and will continue to change.  However, changes in the relative cover of reef compositional components are poorly understood. Emerging satellite, airborne and field-based techniques are providing new approaches to reevaluate reef extent and to track changes in reef composition at ecosystem to global scales. This session organizes and integrates ongoing research from on coral reef cover and change, with particular focus on high spatial and temporal resolution methods and findings.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

1640 Remote sensing [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4220 Coral reef systems [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Greg Asner, Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, United States
Co-chairs:  Chris M Roelfsema1, Lauren Kickham2 and Stuart R Phinn1, (1)University of Queensland, Remote Sensing Research Centre, St Lucia, QLD, Australia(2)Vulcan Inc., Seattle
Primary Liaison:  Jiwei Li, Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, AZ, United States
Moderators:  Greg Asner, Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, United States and Chris M Roelfsema, University of Queensland, Remote Sensing Research Centre, St Lucia, QLD, Australia
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Jiwei Li, Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, AZ, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Multi-species Coral Rescue in Response to the Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) on the Florida Reef Tract (641636)
Ananda Ellis1, Stephanie Schopmeyer2, Robert Ruzicka2, Jennifer M Moore3, Lisa Gregg4, Keri O'Neil5, Andrew Bruckner6, David Gilliam7, Maurizio Martinelli8, Meaghan Johnson9 and Kristi Kerrigan10, (1)Marathon, Florida, United States, (2)Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, St. Petersburg, FL, United States, (3)USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, United States, (4)Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commision, Division of Marine Fisheries Management, St. Petersburg, FL, United States, (5)Florida Aquarium, Apollo Beach, FL, United States, (6)NOAA, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Key West, FL, United States, (7)Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States, (8)Florida Sea Grant, FL, United States, (9)National Park Service Dry Tortugas, Key West, FL, United States, (10)Department of Environmental Protection Florida, FL, United States
 
Remote sensing of shallow-water bathymetry: leveraging multispectral ocean color observations (648453)
Jianwei Wei1, Menghua Wang1, Zhongping Lee2, Henry Briceno3 and Xiaolong Yu4, (1)NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, College Park, MD, United States, (2)Unv. Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, United States, (3)Florida International University, Southeastern Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL, United States, (4)Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
 
Fecal pellets of giant clams, as vectors to transport zooxanthellae. (640610)
Masami Umeki1, Yuji Nakamura2, Hiroshi Yamashita3, Go Suzuki3, Kazuhiko Koike1 and Shinya Morishima4, (1)Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Integrated Sciences for Life, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan, (2)Okinawa Prefectural Fisheries Research and Extension Center, Japan, (3)Seikai National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan, (4)Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Integrated Sciences for Life, Japan