MM34A:
Living on the Edge: Ecotones as Aquatic Transition Zones for Microbial Communities Posters

Session ID#: 85367

Session Description:
Microbial Oceanography has mostly explored the spatial and temporal patterns in microbial community structure and composition at large scales. However, our ability to clearly describe and quantify different ecosystems or niches within these expansive environments remains incomplete. Additionally, identification of ecotones, the transition zones between these different ecosystems, and how ecotones impact the microbial community and ecosystem processes over time is poorly understood. In this session, we will explore, among others, the following questions: How can we detect ecotones, how dynamic are they, who responds to them, and what happens across them over time? Presenters are encouraged to provide evidence for ecotones, their dynamics and their impact across a range of spatial scales, exploring the entire microbial community or any sub-populations within, and how these ecotones and associated communities change over time. We welcome work using any combination of culture-based techniques, -omics, evolutionary/ecological theory, and modelling.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Index Terms:

4277 Time series experiments [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Sergio Morales, University of Otago, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dunedin, New Zealand
Co-Chair:  Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
Primary Liaison:  Sergio Morales, University of Otago, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dunedin, New Zealand
Moderators:  Sergio Morales, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand and Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Federico Baltar, University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Characterization of Microbial Communities on Natural and Transplanted Congener Macroalgae Across the Intertidal Stress Gradient (654601)
Charlotte Quigley1, Kyle Capistrant-Fossa1, Hilary G Morrison2, Ladd Johnson3, Vicki Hertzberg4, Aleksey Morozov2 and Susan Brawley1, (1)University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences, Orono, ME, United States, (2)Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Laval University, Département de Biologie, Quebec City, QC, Canada, (4)Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States
 
Dynamic Definition of Habitat Types in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (639354)
Ajit Subramaniam, Columbia University of New York, LDEO, Palisades, NY, United States, Sarah C. Weber, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research (IOW), Biological Oceanography, Warnemünde, Germany, Ana Fernández-Carrera, University of Vigo, Ecoloxia e Bioloxia Animal, Ourense, Spain, Benjamin Ramcharitar, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Division of Biology and Paleo Environment, Palisades, NY, United States and Joseph Montoya, School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, United States
 
Microbial Ecotones in the Oregon Coast System (657518)
Melissa Steinman, United States, Beatrice Pickett, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States, Samantha Ward, Portland State University, United States and Anne Thompson, Portland State University, Biology, Portland, OR, United States
 
Niche Partitioning Between Coastal and Offshore Shelf Waters Results in Differential Expression of Alkane and PAH Catabolic Pathways (657348)
Shawn Doyle, Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, Genmei Lin, Sun Yat-Sen University, School of Marine Sciences, Zhuhai, China, Maya Morales-McDevitt, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States, Terry Wade, Texas A&M University College Station, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group, College Station, TX, United States, Antonietta Quigg, Texas A&M University at Galveston, Marine Biology, Galveston, TX, United States and Jason B Sylvan, Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States
 
Seasonal dynamics show diverse prokaryotic community linkages between surface and deep ocean water (647784)
Jess Wenley1, Kim Irene Currie2,3, Blair Thomson1, Federico Baltar4 and Sergio Morales1, (1)University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, (2)National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, (3)University of Otago Research Centre for Oceanography, New Zealand, (4)University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
 
Rhodopsin-Containing Microorganisms Thrive in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) Sub-Antarctic Waters (653525)
Babak Hassanzadeh1, Blair Thomson2, Fenella Deans2, Sergio Morales2, Sergio A Sanudo-Wilhelmy3, Federico Baltar4 and Laura Gomez-Consarnau5,6, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, (3)University of Southern California, Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (4)University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria, (5)University of Southern California, Marine and Environmental Biology, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (6)Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, Ensenada, BJ, Mexico
 
Spatial and Temporal Variations in Synechococcus Microdiversity in the Southern California Coastal Ecosystem (653000)
Brian Palenik1, Maitreyi Nagarkar2, Maggie Wang2 and Bellineth Valencia-Ramirez2, (1)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, United States
 
Within New Zealand fjords depth and location influence prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial community composition, but two sources of organic matter shape microbial activity (644568)
Sven Patrik Tobias-Hünefeldt1, Steve Wing1, Federico Baltar2, Nadjejda Espinel-Velasco1 and Sergio Morales1, (1)University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, (2)University of Vienna, Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography, Vienna, Austria
 
Understanding the Community Composition of Deep Sea Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria, Zetaproteobacteria, in the Estuary of Charleston, SC (649516)
Alejandra Enriquez1 and Heather Fullerton1,2, (1)College of Charleston, Biology, Charleston, SC, United States, (2)College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, United States