ME24D:
Microbial Interactions at the Single-Cell Level and Their Relevance in Oceanic Biogeochemical Cycles I Posters

Session ID#: 85387

Session Description:
Marine microbes catalyze chemical transformations that are essential for maintaining ocean ecosystems. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding activities and functional roles at the single-cell level is needed to evaluate their impact on marine biogeochemical cycles. Specific functional roles of individual cells may largely determine the element transformations in the oceans, with enormous biogeochemical implications in extremely different environmental conditions, from photic layers to the deep ocean, including deep-sea sediments. Furthermore, cell-to-cell interactions (e.g. symbiosis, parasitism) established between many different marine microorganisms are essential for the sustainability of the ecosystem and the cycling of many elements. The use of culture-independent methods such as high-throughput sequencing technologies (metagenomes, single cell genomics), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), or the recently proposed single-cell transcriptomic analysis has exponentially expanded our knowledge on the functional and biogeochemical roles of these microbial interactions, yet we are still far from truly understanding the ecological or evolutionary relevance of these kind of microbial partnerships. This session strongly encourages researchers to present methodological or empirical work devoted to gain insight into the single-cell analysis and the diversity and potential biogeochemical impact of interacting microorganisms.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • NC - Nutrient Cycling
Index Terms:

4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4845 Nutrients and nutrient cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4872 Symbiosis [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Francisco Miguel Cornejo-Castillo, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Ana Maria Cabello Perez, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Nestor Gorostidi, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Francisco Miguel Cornejo-Castillo, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Moderators:  Francisco Miguel Cornejo-Castillo, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Ana Maria Cabello Perez, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Francisco Miguel Cornejo-Castillo, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Nestor Gorostidi, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Role of Carbon Transport Proteins in Fueling Open Ocean Nitrogen Fixing Diatom-Cyanobacteria Symbioses (638965)
Mercedes Nieves1, Enrique Flores2, Martin Hagemann3 and Rachel Foster1, (1)Stockholm University, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, (2)CSIC and Universidad de Sevilla, Instituto de Bioquímica Vegetal y Fotosíntesis, Seville, Spain, (3)University of Rostock. Institute of Biological Sciences, Deparment of Plant Physiology, Germany
 
Ecological investigations of diatom viruses: bridging environmental and laboratory studies (657901)
Lisa A Zeigler1, Sarah M Schwenck2, Alice Levesque3, Josh Espinoza3, Hong Zheng1, Ariel Rabines1 and Shawn W Polson4, (1)J. Craig Venter Institute, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)J Craig Venter Institute, United States, (4)University of Delaware, Biological Science, Newark, DE, United States
 
BACTERIAL SURFACE ROUGHNESS AFFECTS VIRAL ATTACHMENT IN SEAWATER (639468)
Yosuke Yamada1,2, Nirav Patel1 and Farooq Azam1, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)OIST Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Onna, Okinawa, Japan
 
Coccoliths as Adsorptive Reservoirs (654990)
Christopher Johns, Alexandra Matthews, Karen Bondoc and Kay D Bidle, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
 
The bacterial signal HHQ disrupts phytoplankton-virus interactions (646338)
Isabelle Johnson1, Elizabeth Harvey2 and Kristen Whalen1, (1)Haverford College, Biology, Haverford, PA, United States, (2)University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, United States
 
Marine Syndiniales Parasites Exhibit Strong Temporal Variability and Ecological Connectivity in Coastal Protist Communities (643149)
Sean Anderson, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography at the University of Georgia, Marine Sciences, Savannah, GA, United States and Elizabeth Harvey, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, United States
 
Unusual marine cyanobacteria/haptophyte symbiosis relies on N2 fixation even in N-rich environments (654523)
Matthew M Mills1, Kendra A Turk-Kubo2, Gert van Dijken1, Britt Anderson Henke2, Katie Jean Harding2, Samuel T Wilson3, Kevin R Arrigo1 and Jonathan P Zehr2, (1)Stanford University, Earth System Science, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (3)Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States
 
Follow the Carbon: From Environment to Microbial Prey to Predator and from Host to Virus using SIP-Raman Microspectroscopy (647792)
Gordon T Taylor1, Felix Weber1, Elena Yakubovskaya2, Tatiana Zaliznyak1, Joaquin Martinez-Martinez3 and Virginia P Edgcomb4, (1)Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook, NY, United States, (2)Stony Brook University, School of Marine & Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook, NY, United States, (3)Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Insights into the role of light and of the haptophyte host in gene expression and activity of the symbiotic, diazotrophic cyanobacterium UCYN-A. (657576)
Marine Landa, Kendra A Turk-Kubo, Francisco Miguel Cornejo-Castillo, Britt Anderson Henke and Jonathan Zehr, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
 
Single-Cell Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Mechanisms of Host-Control and Nutrient Exchange in Acantharia-Phaeocystis Photosymbioses (649069)
Margaret Mars Brisbin, OIST Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Marine Biophysics Unit, Onna, Japan and Satoshi Mitarai, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Marine Biophysics Unit, Onna, Okinawa, Japan
 
Metagenome-amplified genome (MAG) covariation uncovers the genome of the algal host of the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium UCYN-A (656204)
Francisco Miguel Cornejo-Castillo, Kendra A Turk-Kubo, Ana Maria Cabello Perez, Marine Landa and Jonathan P Zehr, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
 
Microscale spatial architecture of "pink berry" microbial aggregates and their symbiotic single-cell interactions using BONCAT-CARD-FISH fluorescence imaging (655755)
Braulio Saul Castillo Villaseñor1, Hugo Doré1 and Elizabeth Wilbanks2, (1)University of California Santa Barbara, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (2)University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, United States
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