CT34B:
Controls on Trace Metal Biogeochemistry and Physicochemical Speciation in Seawater IV Posters

Session ID#: 85790

Session Description:
Trace metals function as essential micronutrients and pollutants in the ocean. Organic complexation, size partitioning, and redox changes of trace elements can be mediated by biological processes including uptake, regeneration, cell lysis, and organic ligand production. Additional processes influencing the production, degradation, and composition of organic matter also play an important role in controlling trace metal distributions, and both vary across environments (e.g. estuaries, open ocean, air-sea-sediment interfaces, hydrothermal systems). In turn, resulting changes in bioavailability and cycling of trace elements governs the function and composition of marine phytoplankton communities. Recent efforts, particularly within GEOTRACES, have expanded the database of trace metal concentrations and physicochemical speciation. This session seeks to link our understanding of biology, organic matter, and trace metal chemistry from molecular to basin-wide scales, from studies related to biologically-mediated transformations of trace elements to the wider processes controlling metal distributions, size partitioning, and fluxes. We welcome submissions highlighting how marine organisms influence the physicochemical speciation of trace elements in seawater, and how changes in trace element chemistry impact the structure and function of marine ecosystems. In addition to observational, experimental and modelling studies, we also invite contributions on the production, degradation, and characterization of metal-binding compounds and colloids.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Index Terms:

4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4807 Chemical speciation and complexation [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4809 Colloids [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4875 Trace elements [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Hannah Whitby, IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, LEMAR, Plouzané, France
Co-chairs:  Randelle M Bundy, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, Jessica N Fitzsimmons, Texas A & M University, Department of Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States and Andrea Koschinsky, Jacobs University Bremen, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Bremen, Germany
Primary Liaison:  Hannah Whitby, IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, LEMAR, Plouzané, France
Moderators:  Emily Estes, University of Delaware, Newark and Veronique Oldham, University of Delaware, College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Lewes, DE, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Randelle M Bundy, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Emily Estes, University of Delaware, Newark

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Distribution of Anaerobic Iron Oxidation in Oxygen Deficient Zones Measured Using Stable Isotope Incubations (652234)
Kenneth McCarthy Bolster, University of Southern California, Department of Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States and James W Moffett, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
Iron sources and cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone assessed using iron isotopes (652643)
Insa Rapp1,2, Matthias Sieber3, Florian Scholz4, Mark James Hopwood4, Tim M Conway5, Ruifang C. Xie4, Martin Frank4, Derek Vance3 and Eric P Achterberg4, (1)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany, (2)Dalhousie University, Department of Biology, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Earth Sciences, Zurich, Switzerland, (4)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (5)University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, United States
 
Predicting Iron(III) Speciation in the Peruvian Upwelling Region (652536)
Kechen Zhu1, Martha Gledhill1, Mark James Hopwood1, Jan E. Groenenberg2, Anja Engel1 and Eric P Achterberg1, (1)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (2)Wageningen University, section soil quality, Wageningen, Netherlands
 
A novel competitive ligand equilibration-cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV) procedure for the fast and ultrasensitive iron speciation in seawater with tenfold sample size reduction (647425)
Francesca Sanvito, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, 22100 Como, Italy, Luis M. Laglera, University of the Balearic Islands, Departamento de Química, 07122 Palma, Spain and Damiano Monticelli, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, 22100 Como, Italy
 
Spatial Variations of Siderophores in the North Pacific Ocean (649100)
Ji Woon Park1, Nicholas Hawco2, Paulina Pinedo-Gonzalez3, Prof Seth John4, Francois Ribalet1, E. Virginia Armbrust1 and Randelle M Bundy1, (1)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)University of Southern California, Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (3)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, (4)University of Southern California, Department of Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
Distributions of natural organic Fe-binding ligands in the eastern and western subarctic Pacific (644536)
Yoshiko Kondo1, Yudai Sunahara1, Jun Nishioka2, Hajime Obata3 and Shigenobu Takeda1, (1)Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan, (2)Hokkaido University, Institute of low temperature science, Sapporo, Japan, (3)Univ Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan
 
Investigating seasonal trends in dissolved iron-binding organic ligands in the BATS region of the North Atlantic Ocean (648945)
Salvatore Caprara1, Bettina M Sohst2, Rodney Johnson3, Daniel Ohnemus4, Alessandro Tagliabue5, Benjamin S Twining6, Peter Sedwick2 and Kristen N Buck1, (1)University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States, (2)Old Dominion University, Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States, (3)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda, (4)Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA, United States, (5)University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (6)Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States
 
Fe(II) biogeochemistry in a changing ocean (634868)
J. Magdalena Santana-Casiano1, Melchor González-Dávila1, Aridane G. González1, Noma Pérez-Almeida1, Guillermo Samperio-Ramos1, Carolina Santana-González1, David González-Santana2 and Maria Luisa Arreguin1, (1)IOCAG. Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, (2)Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne-Occidentale, Brest, France
 
Glacial and hydrothermal sources of dissolved iron(II) in Southern Ocean waters surrounding Heard and McDonald Islands (655974)
Thomas Holmes, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia; Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), Hobart, Australia, Kathrin Wuttig, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Zanna Chase, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Christina Schallenberg, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Pier van der Merwe, Antarctic Gateway Partnership, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, Ashley Townsend, University of Tasmania, Central Science Laboratory, Hobart, TAS, Australia and Andrew R Bowie, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
 
Iron-rich Plumes from Erupting Submarine Volcanoes (657736)
Joseph A Resing1,2, Nathaniel J Buck1,3, Sharon L Walker4, Tamara Baumberger5,6, Edward T Baker7, John E Lupton8 and David A Butterfield3, (1)Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, and NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of Washington, Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean & Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, United States, (4)NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, WA, United States, (5)Oregon State University, Cooperative Institute for Marine Ecosystem and Resource Studies, Newport, United States, (6)NOAA/PMEL, Newport, United States, (7)NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (8)NOAA/PMEL, Newport, OR, United States
 
Estimates of chemical fluxes from Daikoku Seamount - a shallow, erupting, submarine volcano on the Mariana Arc. (654513)
Nathaniel J Buck, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, and NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, WA, United States, Joseph Resing, NOAA/PMEL, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and the Ocean, Seattle, WA, United States, Tamara Baumberger, Oregon State University, Cooperative Institute for Marine Ecosystem and Resource Studies, Newport, United States; NOAA/PMEL, Newport, United States, David A Butterfield, University of Washington, Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean & Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, United States, Edward T Baker, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, Sharon L Walker, NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, WA, United States and Camilla Maya Wilkinson, Oregon State University, CIMRS, Newport, OR, United States
 
Role of Colloids in Controlling Mobilization and Transport of Trace Metals during the Formation of Deep Sea Sediment Plumes (655216)
Katja Schmidt, German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover, Germany, Timo Brengelmann, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany, Sophie Paul, Jacobs University Bremen, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Bremen, Germany and Eric P Achterberg, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
 
Exploring Organic Metal-binding Ligands at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (649453)
Shelby Gunnells1, Colleen Lynn Hoffman2, Maeve C Lohan3, Alessandro Tagliabue4, Alastair J.M. Lough3, Joseph Resing5, Susan Q Lang6 and Randelle M Bundy7, (1)North Dakota State University Main Campus, Geosciences, Fargo, ND, United States, (2)University of Washington Seattle Campus, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Sciences, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (4)University of Liverpool, Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences, Liverpool, L69, United Kingdom, (5)NOAA/PMEL, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and the Ocean, Seattle, WA, United States, (6)University of South Carolina, Earth and Ocean Sciences, Columbia, United States, (7)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States
 
The transport of metal-binding humic substances and dissolved iron from a hydrothermal vent site (TAG, North Atlantic) (650165)
Hannah Whitby1, David Gonzalez Santana2, Marie Cheize3, Arthur Gourain4, Thomas Holmes5, Yoan Germain6, Cecile Cathalot6, Ewan Pelleter7, Yves Fouquet8, Geraldine Sarthou9 and Hélène Planquette9, (1)IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, LEMAR, Plouzané, France, (2)Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne-Occidentale, Plouzané, France, (3)LEMAR, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Brest, France, (4)University of Liverpool, Earth Ocean & Ecological Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (5)University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (6)IFREMER, Department of Marine Geosciences, Plouzané, France, (7)Ifremer, centre de Brest, LGM, Plouzané, France, (8)IFREMER, Plouzané, France, (9)IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, LEMAR, CNRS, Plouzané, France
 
Coastal Contamination by Mining Tailings: Unusual Minor Role of Humic Substances to Soluble and Dissolved Iron Distribution (645649)
Cybelle Menolli Longhini1, Léo Mahieu2, Fabian Sá1, Stan MG van den Berg3, Pascal Salaun4 and Renato Neto1, (1)UFES Federal University of Espírito Santo, Department of Oceanography and Ecology, Vitoria, Brazil, (2)University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (3)Univ Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (4)University of Liverpool, Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom