PI11A:
Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms I

Session ID#: 92393

Session Description:
Marine ecological processes are forced by physical dynamics, yet understanding biological-physical coupling, particularly in nearshore and shallow coastal systems, presents large logistic and conceptual challenges. Ecosystem dynamics reflect multiple biological and physical processes spanning many scales of variability. Linked biological-physical processes influence population, community and ecosystem dynamics and can modulate the effects of large-scale disturbances on shallow-water ecosystems. For example, temperature variability can mitigate coral bleaching, surface waves elicit distinct larval behaviors, and water column stratification mediates cross-shore larval distributions, transport, and intertidal settlement. Identifying the pertinent ecological and hydrodynamic processes, and appraising their relative contribution, requires demanding field observations and time-series data collection. Ecologists increasingly use numerical simulation models to describe near-shore hydrodynamics and ecological dynamics. However, model development depends on including relevant physical processes and using empirical estimates of key biological rates and behaviors, often requiring field observations. Such observations and estimates are difficult to obtain, and frequently, numerical simulation models are untested. This session invites presentations on observational, experimental and time-series approaches that improve our understanding of fundamental biological-physical processes in shallow coastal systems from the surf zone to the shelf edge.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PS - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Smaller
Index Terms:

4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4804 Benthic processes, benthos [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Jesús Pineda, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Co-chairs:  Heidi L Fuchs, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Nathalie Reyns, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States and James Leichter, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Jesús Pineda, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Jesús Pineda, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Nathalie Reyns, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Nathalie Reyns, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Changing phenology and larval transport drive benthic species' wrong-way migrations (640384)
Heidi L Fuchs, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Robert J Chant, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Elias J Hunter, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Enrique Curchitser, Rutgers University, Department of Environmental Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Gregory P Gerbi, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States and Emily Chen, Rutgers, United States
Diel vertical distribution of barnacle larvae in the nearshore waters of La Jolla, CA. (643628)
Gabriela Yamhure1, Nathalie Reyns1 and Jesús Pineda2, (1)University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Larval accumulation and transport in the nearshore support the fundamental role of thermal stratification (649499)
Nathalie Reyns, University of San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States, Jesús Pineda, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Steven J Lentz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Quantifying the relative importance of various physical mechanisms for plankton and nutrient transport between the shore and the shelf waters (649293)
Nirnimesh Kumar, University of Washington, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Seattle, WA, United States, James M Pringle, University of New Hampshire Main Campus, Durham, NH, United States, Melissa Moulton, Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Sutara Suanda, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand and Melanie R Fewings, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States
Spatial Patterns in Nearshore Juvenile Fish Abundance throughout the California Network of Marine Protected Areas as Revealed by Seabird Diet (656857)
Dan P Robinette1, Nadav Nur2 and Jaime Jahncke2, (1)Point Blue Conservation Science, Lompoc, CA, United States, (2)Point Blue Conservation Science, Petaluma, CA, United States
Biophysical interactions between fish larvae and surface slicks enhance a tropical island ecosystem (654444)
Jonathan Whitney1,2, Jamison Gove1, Katharine Smith3, Joey Lecky1, Greg Asner4, Donald R Kobayashi1 and Margaret Anne McManus5, (1)NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (4)Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, United States, (5)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States
Wind-driven circulation and upwelling may enhance particle and nutrient transport by internal waves (656060)
Connor Daniel Dibble, Bodega Marine Lab, Bodega Bay, CA, United States, John L Largier, University of California Davis, Coastal & Marine Sciences Institute, Davis, CA, United States, Steven Morgan, University of California Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory, Bodega Bay, CA, United States, Gerardo Fernandez Aldecoa, CICESE, BJ, Mexico, Lydia B. Ladah, CICESE - CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION CIENTIFICA Y DE EDUCACION SUPERIOR DE ENSENADA, BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY, Ensenada, BJ, Mexico and Anatoliy Erofeevich Filonov, Universidad de Guadalajara, Department of Physics, Guadalajara, JA, Mexico
Three-Way Interaction Between Larval Swimming Behavior, Internal Waves, and the Mean Flow Enhances Cross-Shore Transport (641857)
Jessica C. Garwood1, Andrew J. Lucas2,3, Perry Naughton4, Matthew H Alford1, Paul L Roberts1,5, Jules S Jaffe1, Laura deGelleke6 and Peter J. S. Franks1, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Del Mar Oceanographic, LLC, San Diego, CA, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, United States, (4)University of California San Diego, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, La Jolla, CA, United States, (5)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (6)Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada
Response of small sharks to non-linear internal waves (643762)
Jesús Pineda, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Sally Rouse, Scottish Association for Marine Science, United Kingdom, Victoria Starczak, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, United States, Karl Richard Helfrich, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and David Wiley, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, United States
Non linear interactions between waves and tides on a coral reef atoll (645827)
Camille Grimaldi1, Ryan Lowe1, Jessica Benthuysen2 and Rebecca Green1, (1)The University of Western Australia, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Crawley, WA, Australia, (2)Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, QLD, Australia