OC51A:
Interdisciplinary Approaches for Understanding the Biological Consequences of Global Ocean Change I

Session ID#: 92413

Session Description:
As anthropogenic forcing of marine systems continues, biological responses will have dramatic consequences for the structure and function of marine ecosystems. Manipulative experiments, ocean observations, and quantitative models are three foundational research approaches for understanding the responses of marine species to future environmental change. Investments in biogeochemical tools and ocean observing time series, along with advances in ocean ecosystem and biogeochemical modeling, have afforded us a greatly improved perspective on global change in the ocean. This session will focus on the new generation of ocean environmental change studies that cross disciplinary boundaries. We welcome submissions that link manipulative experimental approaches in the laboratory or field with ocean observations, time series measurements, and/or quantitative modeling approaches as well as contributions that make connections across levels of organization (molecular to global-level processes), spatial scales (nm-km), and temporal scales (past, present, future). Suggested topics include (1) organismal response to changes in abiotic conditions (e.g. multi-stressors) over ecological and geological timescales, (2) links between environmental exposures and organismal performance, and (3) biophysical feedbacks.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Emily Bethana Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
Co-chairs:  David A Hutchins1, Catherine V Davis2 and Naomi Marcil Levine1, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States(2)UC Davis, Petaluma, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Emily Bethana Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
Moderators:  David A Hutchins, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States and Naomi Marcil Levine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  David A Hutchins, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Stressor interactions modify ecological and evolutionary responses of phytoplankton to warming (654999)
Elena Litchman, Michigan State University, Kellogg Biological Station, Hickory Corners, MI, United States, Maria Aranguren-Gassis, University of Vigo, Ourense, Spain, Colin Kremer, Michigan State University, Hickory Corners, MI, United States, Daniel R O'Donnell, Ohio State University, Columbus, United States, Mridul K Thomas, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs Lyngby, Denmark and Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michigan State University, Kellogg Biological Station, Hickory Corners, United States
The biogeochemical implications of the contrasting responses of iron-limited N2-fixing cyanobacteria to ocean warming (642607)
Nina Yang1, Carlin A Merkel1, Yu-An Lin1, Naomi Marcil Levine1, Sara Rivero-Calle2, Hai-bo Jiang3, Nicholas Hawco4, Pingping Qu1, Feixue Fu1 and David A Hutchins1, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, United States, (3)Central China Normal University, China, (4)University of Southern California, Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Iron(II) concentrations and availability for phytoplankton – Multiple stressor studies of a future Southern Ocean (639228)
Helene Aflenzer, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), University of Tasmania, Hobart Tasmania 7001, TAS, Australia; Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Philip W. Boyd, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Collaborative Research Centre (ACE CRC), Univesity of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Pier van der Merwe, Antarctic Gateway Partnership, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, Kathrin Wuttig, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia and Andrew R Bowie, Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; Institute for Marine and Antarctic studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Even Brief, Transitory Exposures to Temperatures Exceeding Decadal Maximum Levels Profoundly Reshapes Coastal California Phytoplankton Community Structure (653013)
Joshua Kling1, Michael D Lee2, Feixue Fu1, Megan Phan1, Xinwei Wang3, Pingping Qu1 and David A Hutchins1, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, United States, (3)Xiamen University, China
Kelp Associated Changes in Seawater Chemistry Connect to Transgenerational Effects in the Purple Urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (656562)
Logan Kozal1, Madeline J Housh2, Clint Nelson3, Terence S Leach4, Juliet M Wong5, Misa Yamamoto6, Jannine D Chamorro2 and Gretchen Hofmann1, (1)University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Ecology Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Barbara, United States, (4)Univeristy of California Santa Barbara, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (5)University of California Santa Barbara, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (6)University of California Santa Barbara, Environmental Studies, United States
Oxygen Dependence of Visual Physiology and Behavior in Marine Invertebrate Larvae and Its Ecological Implications (654201)
Lillian McCormick, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, Nicholas W Oesch, University of California San Diego, Psychology, La Jolla, CA, United States and Lisa A Levin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
Ocean Acidification Thresholds for Eastern Oysters (651434)
Emily Bethana Rivest1, Mark J Brush2, Richard Carl Zimmerman3, Victoria J Hill4, Arien Widrick1 and Sara Blachman1, (1)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (2)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (3)Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, & Atmospheic Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States, (4)Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, & Atmospheric Science, Norfolk, VA, United States
“Wasting” Time: Phenology and Ecological Impact of Seagrass Wasting Disease in Eelgrass Meadows (643407)
Lillian Rachel Aoki1, Olivia Graham1, Drew Harvell1, Sukanya Dayal2, Tiffany Stephens3, Joshua Stokes4, Brendan Rappazzo5 and Carla Gomes6, (1)Cornell University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Ithaca, NY, United States, (2)Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States, (3)University of Alaska Fairbanks, United States, (4)Southeast Missouri State University, United States, (5)Cornell University, Computer Science, Ithaca, NY, United States, (6)Cornell University, Department of Computer Science, Ithaca, United States