PI41A:
Ecological Fluid Mechanics: Interactions Among Organisms and Their Fluid Environment I

Session ID#: 92444

Session Description:
The session will be dedicated to reports from studies of interactions among organisms and their fluid environment. The session addresses the role that fluid motion, flow gradients, and chemical stirring play in shaping organism behavior, interactions, recruitment, reproduction, and community structure. Relevant studies span topics of biomechanics, transport and settling, propulsion, and sensory ecology. Themes may include the influence of instantaneous flow patterns, the influence of extreme physical events, the influence of scale on the biological-physical coupling, and biological/ecological advantages mediated by flow and chemical transport. For instance, what can we learn from how organisms balance physical versus biological forcing? We invite studies addressing a broad range of taxonomic groups and flow regimes spanning creeping, laminar, unsteady, wavy, and turbulent flows.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
Index Terms:

4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4899 General or miscellaneous [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Donald R Webster, Georgia Institute of Technology, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States
Co-chairs:  Brad Gemmell, University of South Florida, Department of Integrative Biology, Tampa, FL, United States and Arvind Santhanakrishnan, Oklahoma State University, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Stillwater, OK, United States
Primary Liaison:  Donald R Webster, Georgia Institute of Technology, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States
Moderators:  Donald R Webster, Georgia Institute of Technology, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States and Brad Gemmell, University of South Florida, Department of Integrative Biology, Tampa, FL, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Brad Gemmell, University of South Florida, Department of Integrative Biology, Tampa, FL, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

The Planktonic Streaking Hypothesis (648156)
Bryce Inman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States and Peter J. S. Franks, Univ California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
Dynamic Unsteady Sinking Behavior in Marine Diatoms: Rapid Responses to Changing Nutrient Conditions (651862)
Kevin Du Clos, University of South Florida, Integrative Biology, Tampa, FL, United States, Lee Karp-Boss, University of Maine, Orono, ME, United States, Tracy A Villareal, The University of Texas at Austin, Port Aransas, TX, United States and Brad Gemmell, University of South Florida, Department of Integrative Biology, Tampa, FL, United States
Transitory planktonic attachments enhance nutrient transport to the host and symbiont cells (651826)
Eva Kanso, University of Southern California, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA, United States, Rubens Mendes Lopes, University of Sao Paulo, Department of Biological Oceanography, Sao Paulo, Brazil, J Rudi Strickler, John Dabiri, Caltech, Graduate Aerospace Laboratories and Mechanical Engineering, Pasadena, CA, United States and Jack Costello, Providence College, Biology, Providence, RI, United States
Shaping the Coral Diffusive Boundary Layer by Cilia Beating (641302)
Cesar Pacherres1,2, Soeren Ahmerkamp3,4, Gertraud Maria Schmidt5, Claudio Richter2,5 and Moritz Holtappels5, (1)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bentho-Pelagic Processes, Bremerhaven, Germany, (2)University of Bremen, Biology/Chemistry, Bremen, Germany, (3)Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany, (4)MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (5)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany
Swept Away: Fine-scale Water Motion Encountered by Microscopic Animals on Surfaces in Turbulent Ambient Flow, Hydrodynamic Forces, and Adhesion (639795)
Mimi A.R. Koehl, Univ. of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States and T. H. Gonzalinjec, University of California, Berkeley, United States
Larval Wobble: A Novel Vertical Swimming Behavior in Larvae of the Common Slipper Shell, Crepidula fornicata (651313)
Lauren S Mullineaux, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Michelle H DiBenedetto, Menlo Park, CA, United States, Anthony Pires, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA, United States, Erik Anderson, Grove City College, Grove City, PA, United States and Karl Richard Helfrich, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Vigorous self-locomotion drives efficient mate finding in planktonic copepods swimming in turbulence (642781)
François-Gaël Michalec, ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, Itzhak Fouxon, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, Sami Souissi, University of Lille, Laboratory of Oceanology and Geosciences, Wimereux, France and Markus Holzner, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL / EAWAG, Birmensdorf, Switzerland
Copepod behavior responses around internal waves (641816)
Mohammad Mohaghar1, Seongyu Jung1, Kevin A Haas2 and Donald R Webster1, (1)Georgia Institute of Technology, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States, (2)Georgia Tech Savannah, Civil Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States