CP51B:
Extreme Sea Levels and Coastal Flood Risk I

Session ID#: 92805

Session Description:
Extreme sea levels emerge as a combination of regional mean sea level, astronomic tides, storm surges, a dynamic wave component, and, in deltas and estuaries, river discharge. Inundation of coastal areas arises from the superposition of these components and can lead to moderate (but frequent) impacts related to tidal flooding, or devastating social, economic, and environmental consequences due to rare extreme events. The 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons in the North Atlantic were only the latest reminders of the vulnerability of low-lying densely populated and highly developed coastlines. In order to plan effective adaptation to coastal flooding hazards it is essential to improve the understanding of the links between different sea level components, and how they are modulated by climate change and variability, individually and in combination. This session seeks contributions from studies that have: (i) examined changes in any of the sea level components outlined above and their links to climate change and variability (past and future), (ii) undertaken statistical or process-based model analyses of extreme sea levels or its individual components, (iii) assessed how changes in sea level modulate coastal flood risk, (iv) or taken an integrated approach toward flood hazard and vulnerability evaluation of complex coastal systems.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
  • PS - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Smaller
Index Terms:

1641 Sea level change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4546 Nearshore processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4564 Tsunamis and storm surges [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Thomas Wahl, University of Central Florida, Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering & National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL, United States
Co-chairs:  Sönke Dangendorf, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, United States; University of Siegen, Research Institute for Water and Environment, Siegen, Germany, Katherine Serafin, University of Florida, Geography, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States; Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, Stanford, CA, United States and William Sweet, NOAA/NOS, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Primary Liaison:  Thomas Wahl, University of Central Florida, Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering & National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL, United States
Moderators:  Thomas Wahl, University of Central Florida, Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering & National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL, United States and Katherine Serafin, University of Florida, Geography, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States; Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, Stanford, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Thomas Wahl, University of Central Florida, Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering & National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL, United States and Katherine Serafin, University of Florida, Geography, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States; Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, Stanford, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Addressing Needs in Observed and Simulated Storm Surge Data for Uncertainty Quantification (641728)
Taylor Asher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, Rick Luettich, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, United States, Jennifer L Irish, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, United States, Pulong Ma, Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States, Michelle Bensi, University of Maryland College Park, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College Park, United States and Donald Resio, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL, United States
Coastal flood risk and adaptation strategies under deep uncertainty – a modelling framework (645779)
Leigh MacPherson1, Jan Merkens2, Thomas van der Pol3, Sönke Dangendorf4, Athanasios Vafeidis2 and Jochen Hinkel3, (1)University of Siegen, Siegen, Germany, (2)University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (3)Global Climate Forum, Berlin, Germany, (4)Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, United States
Contribution of Wave Setup and Swash to Projected Coastal Sea Level Changes (639195)
Angelique Melet, Mercator Ocean International, Toulouse, France, Rafael Almar, Laboratoire d'Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales (LEGOS), IRD, Toulouse, France, Mark A Hemer, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Goneri Le Cozannet, BRGM, Orléans, France, Benoit Meyssignac, CNES, LEGOS, Toulouse, France and Peter Ruggiero, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
Effects of multiple flood drivers on urban flooding due to joint coastal and fluvial mechanisms (639176)
Agnieszka Indiana Olbert1, Joanne Comer2, Stephen Nash1 and Michael Hartnett1, (1)National University of Ireland Galway, College of Science and Engineering, Ryan Institute, Galway, Ireland, (2)Office of Public Works, Galway, Ireland
Simulating extreme storm floods in the German Bight – past variability & future changes (646158)
Andreas Lang, Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, Ocean in the Earth System, Hamburg, Germany and Uwe Mikolajejewicz, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
The influence of human induced landscape and bathymetry changes on tides, surge and extreme water levels (655083)
Stefan A Talke, California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, Civil and Environmental Engineering, San Luis Obispo, SC, United States, Ramin Familkhalili, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States, Lumas T Helaire, Portland State University, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Portland, OR, United States, David A Jay, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States, Philip M Orton, Stevens Institute of Technology, Union City, NJ, United States and David K Ralston, WHOI, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States