MM41A:
Coupling Meta’omics and Biochemical Measurements to Understand Trophic Strategies or Physiological Adaptations Among Marine Organisms (Micro to Macro) I

Session ID#: 92924

Session Description:
In the coming decades, one approach for improving how we measure and quantify the ecological significance of marine organisms (including microbes to macrofauna) and understand their physiological changes as a result of the individual and interactive effects of environmental change, is to pair meta’omics and biogeochemical measurements more succinctly. Traditional metrics for tracking physiological changes in organisms are key to understanding the status of a complex community, however, molecular approaches allow us to derive a more fundamental understanding as to why a particular phenotype is expressed or a specific genotype succeeds. Furthermore, the coupling of these sequence-based datasets (‘omics) with biogeochemical measurements (i.e., uptake rates, biomass quantification, direct visualization, pigment analysis, isotope tracers, etc.), is a powerful means to investigate vital trophic linkages in microbial food webs, understand biological responses to perturbations, and provide insight into successful adaptations and acclimations in the ocean biome. We specifically aim to bring together researchers to share studies which leverage the methodological integration of sequence data sets with biogeochemical measurements. Studies focusing on any trophic level and domain are welcome. Another goal of the session is to pose the question: ‘What take-home message from your study would not have materialized without the integration of molecular and non-molecular methods?’
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Brook L Nunn, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States
Co-chairs:  Alexis Pasulka, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Department of Biological Sciences, San Luis Obispo, CA, United States and Emma Timmins-Schiffman, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Sarah K Hu, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Brook L Nunn, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States and Emma Timmins-Schiffman, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Brook L Nunn, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

All in a day's work: feeding, digestion and carbon transformation by microzooplankton (652143)
Tatiana A Rynearson1, Ewelina T Rubin1, Amanda L Montalbano1 and Susanne Menden-Deuer2, (1)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, United States
Proteome Expression in a Marine Photoheterotroph under Carbon and Nitrogen Limitation (647708)
Gwendolyn Gallagher and Jacob Waldbauer, University of Chicago, Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL, United States
The Impact of Phagotrophic Protists at Hot Spots of Primary Production in the Deep Sea (648512)
Sarah K Hu1, Erica Herrera2, Amy Renee Smith3, Maria Pachiadaki4, Virginia P Edgcomb5 and Julie A Huber1, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)University of Texas at El Paso, Chemistry, El Paso, TX, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (5)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Evolution of the microbial community within a westward propagating coastal filament in the California Current Ecosystem (656747)
Sara R. Rivera1, Daniel Petras1,2, Brandon M Stephens3, Ariel Rabines1, Andrew Allen1 and Lihini Aluwihare1, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of California San Diego, School of Pharmacy, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute/Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Probing the cellular pathways governing aerobic anoxygenic phototrophy (653673)
Gabriel Vargas, University of Chicago, Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL, United States and Maureen Coleman, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
Subantarctic phytoplankton communities encounter climate change: Incubations to track the molecular underpinnings of the measured physiology (654377)
Emma Timmins-Schiffman, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States, Brook L Nunn, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States, Michael Joseph Ellwood, Australian National University, Research School of Earth Sciences, Canberra, ACT, Australia, Robert F Strzepek, University of Tasmania, Antarctic Gateway Partnership, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), Hobart, TAS, Australia and Philip W. Boyd, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Diatom community transcriptomic response to nitrate and silicon limitation (655698)
Michael A. Maniscalco, University of California Santa Barbara, Ecology Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, Mark A Brzezinski, University of California, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, Heather McNair, University of Rhode Island - Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Jeffrey W Krause, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, AL, United States and Kimberlee Thamatrakoln, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
Differential activity of coexisting Prochlorococcus ecotypes (640897)
Anne W Thompson, Portland State University, Department of Biology, Portland, OR, United States and Kathleen Kouba, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States