SI34B:
Ocean-Based Solutions to Address Local to Global Human Impacts II Posters

Session ID#: 92952

Session Description:
The ocean is facing many anthropogenic pressures including warming, sea level rise, ocean acidification, deoxygenation, extreme events, eutrophication, plastic pollution, biodiversity loss, and habitat modification. Managing these pressures requires interdisciplinary science to develop practical solutions. This session seeks to bridge current scientific research with management, technological, and society-based solutions from local-to-global scales. We solicit submissions aimed at creating solutions for a range of ocean issues and integrate science within the engineering, management, and stakeholder spheres. Research topics include, but are not limited to: 

  1. Management of species vulnerability (e.g., assisted evolution or migration; role of MPAs; ecosystem restoration aimed at increasing resilience)
  2. Data-based adaptive management actions (e.g., model forecasting for adaptive management of fisheries; use of high-resolution upwelling, hypoxia, heat wave, and range shift forecasting; innovative data platforms for use by marine stakeholders)
  3. Local solutions that manage environmental conditions (e.g., remediation, mitigation of heat stress, acidification, hypoxia, pollution, eutrophication, etc.) 
  4. The ocean's role in COremoval (e.g., marine renewable energy; blue carbon)
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ED - Education, Outreach and Policy
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
6334 Regional planning [POLICY SCIENCES & PUBLIC ISSUES]
6344 System operation and management [POLICY SCIENCES & PUBLIC ISSUES]
6620 Science policy [POLICY SCIENCES & PUBLIC ISSUES]
Primary Chair:  Lydia Kapsenberg, CSIC Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain
Co-chairs:  Hayley Carter, California Ocean Science Trust, Oakland, CA, United States, Faycal Kessouri, University of California Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States and Caren Braby, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Primary Liaison:  Lydia Kapsenberg, CSIC Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain
Moderators:  Lydia Kapsenberg, CSIC Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain and Hayley Carter, California Ocean Science Trust, Oakland, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Faycal Kessouri, University of California Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Effects of Rossby Wave Energy Propagation on Precipitation Anomalies in the Yangtze River Valley (643423)
Tiangui Xiao1, Chao Wang1, Ronghua Jin2 and Yuan Ningle1, (1)Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu, China, (2)China Meterological Administration, Beijing, China
 
Breaking Coastal Hypoxia: Destratification of Gulf of Mexico Deadzone Through Artificially Enhancing Oxygen Transport Downwards to Maintain Marine Faunae (657770)
Veda Thipparthi, Louisiana State University, Chemical Engineering, Baton Rouge, LA, United States, Louis J Thibodeaux, Louisiana State Univ, Baton Rouge, LA, United States and David W Constant, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, United States
 
Coral Reef Arks: An Innovative Solution for Mitigation of Coral Reef Damage (640063)
Jason Baer, United States, Forest Rohwer, San Diego State University, Biology, San Diego, CA, United States and Aaron Conrey Hartmann, Harvard University, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Cambridge, MA, United States
 
Effect of Artificial Upwelling on Preventing Coral Bleaching During Times of Thermal Stress: Strategies for Survival in a Warming Ocean (637718)
Moronke Harris1, Yvonne Sawall1, Mario Lebrato2, Marlene Wall3 and Ellias Feng3, (1)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, Coral Reef Ecology and Optics Laboratory, St. George's, Bermuda, (2)Bazaruto Center for Scientific Studies (BCSS), Benguerra Island, Mozambique, (3)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
 
Impact of water recycling on wastewater effluent plumes in drought-stricken regions in ocean acidification and hypoxia contexts (654566)
Minna Ho1, Faycal Kessouri1, Martha Sutula1, Daniele Bianchi2, James C McWilliams3, Maarten J Molemaker2, Timu Gallien4 and George L Robertson5, (1)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (2)University of California Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (3)University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, United States, (4)University of California Los Angeles, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (5)Orange County Sanitation District, Fountain Valley, CA, United States
 
Island Refugia and the Catalina Dynamic Ocean Chemistry Program (642143)
Craig Gelpi, Catalina Marine Society, Lake Balboa, CA, United States
 
Motivating governments to proactively respond to the impacts of ocean acidification by charting a course of action for sustaining coastal communities and livelihoods. (654279)
Jessie Turner, Cascadia Consulting Group, Government Affairs and Policy Specialist, Olympia, WA, United States
 
New directions in ocean attribution science – tying acidification and other changes to specific emission sources (656791)
Rachel Licker, Union of Concerned Scientists Washington DC, Washington, DC, United States, Brenda Ekwurzel, Union of Concerned Scientists, Washington, DC, United States, Scott Doney, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States, Sarah R Cooley, Ocean Conservancy Inc., Washington, DC, United States, Ivan D Lima, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Richard Heede, Climate Mitigation Partners, Snowmass, CO, United States and Peter C Frumhoff, Union of Concerned Scientists, Cambridge, MA, United States
 
Next generation ocean iron fertilization: Are there hotspots in the Southern Ocean that could sustain long-term removal of atmospheric CO2? (644995)
Lennart Thomas Bach, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Ecology and Biodiversity, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Veronica Tamsitt, University of New South Wales, Climate Change Research Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Kimberlee Baldry, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), Hobart, TAS, Australia and Philip W. Boyd, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
 
Oregon’s Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Action Plan and on-the-water management adaptation to ocean change (656108)
Caren Braby, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States, Jack A Barth, Oregon State University, Marine Studies Initiative, Corvallis, OR, United States and Charlotte Regula-Whitefield, Oregon Dept of Fish and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
 
POTENTIAL OF MARITIME TRANSPORT IN THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA FOR OCEAN LIMING AND CO2 REMOVAL (651745)
Stefano Caserini1, Dario Pagano2, Francesco Campo2, Giovanni Cappello3 and Mario Grosso2, (1)Politecnico di Milano, Milano, 20133, Italy, (2)Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Milano, Italy, (3)CO2APPS, Italy
 
Potential Shell Hash Mitigation of Coastal Acidification for Juvenile Oysters Reared in Upwellers (656087)
Catherine Wilhelm1, Nichole Price2, Meredith White3, Tessa Houston4, Rich Smith3, Brittney Honisch5 and Curtis Bohlen6, (1)College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, United States, (2)Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, (3)Mook Sea Farm, ME, United States, (4)Colby College, ME, United States, (5)Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, (6)Casco Bay Estuary Partnership, ME, United States
 
Reef and wild fishery conservation through exploiting satellite remote sensing of the marine carbonate system (652486)
Jamie Shutler1, Peter Land2, Helen S Findlay2, Nicolas Gruber3, Yves Quilfen4, Emmanuelle Autret5, Jean-François Piollé6, Thomas Holding7, Ian Ashton8, Roberto Sabia9 and Diego Fernandez-Prieto10, (1)University of Exeter, Centre for Geography, Environment and Society, Penryn, United Kingdom, (2)Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, (3)ETH Zurich, Environmental Physics, Zurich, Switzerland, (4)IFREMER/Univ. Brest, CNRS, IRD, Laboratoire Océanographie Physique et Spatiale, Plouzané, France, (5)IFREMER, Univ. Brest, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, Laboratoire d'Océanographie Physique et Spatiale (LOPS), Plouzané, France, (6)IFREMER, LOPS/CERSAT, Plouzané, France, (7)University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom, (8)University of Exeter, United Kingdom, (9)Telespazio-Vega for European Space Agency, Frascati, Italy, (10)European Space Research Institute (ESRIN) - European Space Agency (ESA), Frascati, Italy
 
Seagrass ecosystems buffer low pH in coastal areas (656277)
Aurora M Ricart, Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California Davis & Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Bodega Bay, CA, United States, Melissa Ward, Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States, Tessa M Hill, University California Davis, Earth and Planetary Sciences and Bodega Marine Laboratory, Davis, CA, United States, Brian Gaylord, Department of Evolution and Ecology, University of California Davis and Bodega Marine Laboratory, Bodega Bay, CA, United States, Eric Sanford, Bodega Marine Lab, Bodega Bay, CA, United States, Kristy Kroeker, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States, Sarah Merolla, Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California Davis, Bodega bay, CA, United States, Priya Shukla, Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California Davis, Bodega Bay, CA, United States and Yuichiro Takeshita, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States
 
Source Apportionment of Perfluoroalkyl sSubstances in Sediments of the Western Arctic and Bering Sea: Implications for Transport Pathway and Wildlife Exposure (644127)
Yan Lin1, Jheng-Jie Jiang2 and Mingang Cai1, (1)Xiamen University, Xiamen, China, (2)Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan
 
State-Level Action on Ocean Acidification: States Care More than You Think (Invited) (647291)
Melissa McCutcheon, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, Physical and Environmental Sciences, Corpus Christi, TX, United States, Sarah R Cooley, Ocean Conservancy Inc., Washington, DC, United States and Ryan Ono, Ocean Conservancy, United States
 
The Effects of Temperature, Body Size, and Oxygen Variation on the Future Habitable Range of Pacific Red Abalone (Haliotis rufescens) (643572)
Hailey Deres1, Thomas H Boag2, Richard George George Stockey3, Fiorenza Micheli4, Curtis A. Deutsch5 and Erik A Sperling3, (1)United States, (2)Stanford University, Department of Geology, Stanford, CA, United States, (3)Stanford University, Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford, United States, (4)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, (5)University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, United States