ME11A:
Impacts of Ecological Interactions on Marine Ecosystem Dynamics and Biodiversity: New Insights from Theory, Models, and Field Measurements I

Session ID#: 93027

Session Description:
Ocean ecosystems make up the largest living space on the planet. Understanding the behavior, physiology, and evolution of marine organisms in the context of their chemical and physical environments and species interactions is key to advancing our understanding of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning across systems. Multiple general concepts in ecology have originated from pelagic systems, including ecological stoichiometry, trophic cascades, and the match/mismatch hypothesis. However, a fundamental hurdle in advancing our understanding of ecological processes in the ocean remains the traditional boundary between ecology and oceanography. In this session, we seek to bring together oceanographers and ecologists posing questions about ocean ecosystems, bridging empirical investigations with ecological theory and process models. We welcome both theoretical and empirical research addressing ecological interactions and biodiversity across a range of scales and trophic levels, with particular emphasis on the integration of field sampling, ecological theory, or modeling aimed to reveal processes structuring ocean ecosystems. Presentations may include innovative observational or experimental approaches, ranging from microscopy, imaging, flow cytometry and remote sensing, to molecular (e.g. -omics), trait-based, or isotopic tools, with the aim to characterize variability in diet, diversity (taxonomy, barcoding, metabarcoding), abundance, and/or the physiological status of organisms in response to perturbations and interactions. We especially look to highlight recent advances since 2018.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Primary Chair:  Clifton Brock Woodson, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States
Co-chairs:  Bingzhang Chen, University of Strathclyde, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Glasgow, United Kingdom, Vittoria Roncalli, Stazione zoologica A. Dohrn, Naples, Italy and Steven Yitzchak Litvin, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Steven Yitzchak Litvin, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States
Moderators:  Steven Yitzchak Litvin, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States and Bingzhang Chen, University of Strathclyde, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Steven Yitzchak Litvin, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Linking phytoplankton diversity in the North Atlantic to the annual cycle of ecological disturbance and recovery (648918)
Lee Karp-Boss1, Luis Manuel Bolanos2, Stephen J Giovannoni2, Jason Graff3, Consuelo Carbonell-Moore4, Nils Haentjens1, Alison Chase1, Emmanuel Boss1 and Michael Behrenfeld3, (1)University of Maine, Orono, ME, United States, (2)Oregon State University, Department of Microbiology, Corvallis, OR, United States, (3)Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, (4)Oregon State University, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Corvallis, OR, United States
The Collapse of Prochlorococcus Populations in the Transition Between the Subtropical and Subpolar Gyres (643989)
Stephanie Dutkiewicz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States and Christopher L Follett, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Earth Atmosphere and Planetary Science, Cambridge, MA, United States
Rapid Adaption of the Microbial Community to Abrupt Environmental Change in the Gulf of Mexico Modeled with the Genome-based EmergeNt Ocean Microbial Ecosystem Model (646675)
Jiaze Wang1, Victoria Coles1, Michael R Stukel2 and Olivia Mason3, (1)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States, (2)Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (3)Florida State University, Tallahassee, United States
Improving the predictability of plankton population dynamics using the portfolio effect (652689)
Vitul Agarwal, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, Chase Chandler James, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, Claire E Widdicombe, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, United Kingdom and Andrew David Barton, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, La Jolla, CA, United States
Plankton interactions and community compositions in the North Pacific Ocean (651378)
Mathilde Dugenne, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Angelicque E White, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Laurie W Juranek, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States and Nicholas Hawco, University of Southern California, Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
A Modeling Approach to Determine How Prey Size Choice Reveals an Emergent Keystone Predator Effect in Planktonic Communities (644128)
Darcy Taniguchi, California State University San Marcos, Biology, San Marcos, CA, United States, Michael J Follows, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States and Susanne Menden-Deuer, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Molecular Diversity Among Holopelagic Sargassum Morphotypes in the North Atlantic (651493)
Skye Dibner1, Deborah Goodwin2, Jeffrey M Schell2, Kerry Whittaker3 and Amy NS Siuda4, (1)Eckerd College, Marine Science, St. Petersburg, United States, (2)Sea Education Association, Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Sea Education Association, Oceanography, Woods Hole, United States, (4)Eckerd College, Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, United States
25-Year Record of In Situ Pelagic Sargassum Observations in the Western North Atlantic and Caribbean Reveals a Shift in Distribution and Range Expansion of Three Common Morphotypes (651375)
Deborah Goodwin1, Amy NS Siuda2 and Jeffrey M Schell1, (1)Sea Education Association, Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)Eckerd College, Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, United States