ME31A:
Using Satellite Remote Sensing and in Situ Data to Evaluate Marine Biodiversity and Ecosystems I

Session ID#: 93039

Session Description:
Marine ecosystems and the wildlife that characterizes them are essential to the overall health of the planet. They are a primary food source for many localities and drive many other aspects of the ocean economy.  Over 2,000 marine species are now endangered or threatened globally in coral reef, seagrass, mangrove, sea ice, deep sea corals, and pelagic and deep-sea habitats. Stressors include pollution, fishing gear entanglements, overfishing, acidification and a changing climate. New initiatives – in particular the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network that is working in partnership with the US Integrated Ocean Observing System, the Global Ocean Observing System, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) and global partners including industry – are now making observations needed to conserve and manage marine resources to evaluate local marine biodiversity and health in a regional to global context. These data range from satellite remote sensing to animal tracking to a variety of “omics” approaches. Such data help improve monitoring and forecasting of the effects of stressors on marine biodiversity. They are fundamental for developing mitigation strategies.  Interdisciplinary projects that effectively combine remotely sensed and various types of in situ data to develop products and tools to enhance marine decision support and conservation are particularly encouraged.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

4262 Ocean observing systems [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4813 Ecological prediction [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Maury Gordon Estes Jr, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, United States
Co-chairs:  William W Turner, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC, DC, United States, Gabrielle Canonico, NOAA U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System, Silver Spring, United States and Frank E Muller-Karger, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, IMaRS, St Petersburg, United States
Primary Liaison:  Maury Gordon Estes Jr, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Earth System Science Center, Huntsville, AL, United States
Moderators:  Maury Gordon Estes Jr, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Earth System Science Center, Huntsville, AL, United States and Frank E Muller-Karger, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, IMaRS, St Petersburg, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Gabrielle Canonico, NOAA U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System, Silver Spring, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Dynamic satellite seascapes as a biogeographic framework for understanding phytoplankton phenology of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, USA (652960)
Enrique Montes, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, St Petersburg, FL, United States, Anni Djurhuus, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St Petersburg, FL, United States, Frank E Muller-Karger, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, IMaRS, St Petersburg, United States, Daniel Brooks Otis, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, IMaRS, St Petersburg, FL, United States, Chris R Kelble, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory - NOAA, Ocean Chemistry & Ecosystems Division, Miami, United States and Maria T Kavanaugh, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States
Spatial and interannual variability of seascape and micronekton assemblage associations in the California Current Ecosystem (649427)
Willem Klajbor1, Maria T Kavanaugh1, Lorenzo Ciannelli1, Christopher Harvey2, Jarrod A Santora3 and John C Field4, (1)Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2)NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (4)FED, SWFSC, NOAA, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Comparing the efficiency of biodiversity monitoring programs (640082)
Gema Hernan, Alexandra Dubel and Andrew Rassweiler, Florida State University, Department of Biological Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States
Choosing an efficient portfolio of sampling strategies for monitoring marine biodiversity (643873)
Andrew Rassweiler, Gema Hernan and Alexandra Dubel, Florida State University, Department of Biological Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States
Seasonal Patterns in Protist Diversity Across Depths in the Santa Barbara Channel (652736)
Paul G Matson1,2, Dylan Catlett3, Craig A Carlson4, Thomas S Lankiewicz5, David Siegel6, Emma Wear6,7 and Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez8, (1)Bowling Green State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (4)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute/Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (5)University of California, Santa Barbara, United States, (6)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (7)University of Montana, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Polson, MT, United States, (8)University of California, Santa Barbara, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, United States
Integrating high-throughput sequencing observations into remotely sensible phytoplankton functional type determinations (647009)
Dylan Catlett1, David Siegel2, Craig A Carlson3, Paul G Matson4,5, Emma Wear2,6 and Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez7, (1)University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute/Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (4)University of California, Santa Barbara, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (5)Bowling Green State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green, CA, United States, (6)University of Montana, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Polson, MT, United States, (7)University of California, Santa Barbara, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, United States
Policy implications for remotely sensed pelagic habitats (638978)
Jacqueline F Tweddle, University of Aberdeen, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Aberdeen, United Kingdom and Maria T Kavanaugh, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States