ME33B:
Using Satellite Remote Sensing and in Situ Data to Evaluate Marine Biodiversity and Ecosystems II

Session ID#: 93043

Session Description:
Marine ecosystems and the wildlife that characterizes them are essential to the overall health of the planet. They are a primary food source for many localities and drive many other aspects of the ocean economy.  Over 2,000 marine species are now endangered or threatened globally in coral reef, seagrass, mangrove, sea ice, deep sea corals, and pelagic and deep-sea habitats. Stressors include pollution, fishing gear entanglements, overfishing, acidification and a changing climate. New initiatives – in particular the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network that is working in partnership with the US Integrated Ocean Observing System, the Global Ocean Observing System, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) and global partners including industry – are now making observations needed to conserve and manage marine resources to evaluate local marine biodiversity and health in a regional to global context. These data range from satellite remote sensing to animal tracking to a variety of “omics” approaches. Such data help improve monitoring and forecasting of the effects of stressors on marine biodiversity. They are fundamental for developing mitigation strategies.  Interdisciplinary projects that effectively combine remotely sensed and various types of in situ data to develop products and tools to enhance marine decision support and conservation are particularly encouraged.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

4262 Ocean observing systems [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4813 Ecological prediction [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Maury Gordon Estes Jr, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, United States
Co-chairs:  William W Turner, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC, DC, United States, Gabrielle Canonico, NOAA U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System, Silver Spring, United States and Frank E Muller-Karger, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, IMaRS, St Petersburg, United States
Primary Liaison:  Maury Gordon Estes Jr, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Earth System Science Center, Huntsville, AL, United States
Moderators:  Gabrielle Canonico, NOAA U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System, Silver Spring, United States and Frank E Muller-Karger, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, IMaRS, St Petersburg, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Maury Gordon Estes Jr, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Earth System Science Center, Huntsville, AL, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Fore-C: Ecological forecasts of coral disease to create opportunities for timely, effective management (656036)
Megan Donahue1, Jamie Caldwell1, Scott F Heron2, Austin Greene1, Erick Francis Geiger3,4, Gang Liu3,4, Jacqueline L De La Cour3,4, Tracy D. Ainsworth5, William Leggat6, Tess Moriarty6, Laurie J Raymundo7 and C. Mark Eakin3, (1)University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology, Kane‘ohe, HI, United States, (2)James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia, (3)NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Coral Reef Watch, College Park, MD, United States, (4)Global Science and Technology Inc Greenbelt, Greenbelt, MD, United States, (5)University of New South Wales, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (6)University of Newcastle, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Callaghan, NSW, Australia, (7)University of Guam, University of Guam Marine Laboratory, Mangilao, Guam
Predicting depth-varying thermal stress on corals in the tropical Pacific using ocean surface variables and in situ temperature observations (648746)
Travis Allen Schramek1, Mark A Merrifield1, Patrick Colin2, Bruce D Cornuelle1, Ganesh Gopalakrishnan1, Sonia Rowley3 and Eric Terrill4, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Coral Reef Research Foundation, Koror, Palau, (3)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (4)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Satellites, Servers, and Spatial Overlay: A multifaceted workflow for investigating spatial determinants of Coral Bleaching Trends across the Pacific (646763)
Rosanna Neuhausler, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States, Laurel Larsen, University of California, Department of Geography, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Berkeley, United States and C. Mark Eakin, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Coral Reef Watch, College Park, MD, United States
EVALUATING IN SITU AND SATELLITE-BASED SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND CORAL-SYMBIONT COMMUNITY DYNAMICS IN LA PARGUERA, PUERTO RICO (639785)
Andrea Michelle Gomez, CUNY Graduate Center, City College of New York, Earth and Environmental Sciences, New York, NY, United States; NOAA EPP Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar, New York, NY, United States, Kyle McDonald, CUNY City College of New York, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science, New York, NY, United States; NOAA Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies and Department of Earth & Atmospheric Science, New York, NY, United States, Karsten Shein, ExplorEIS, Ashville, NC, United States, Stephanie DeVries, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Geology and Environmental Sciences, Chattanooga, United States, Milton Carlo, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR, United States, Roy Armstrong, University of Puerto Rico, Dept. Marine Sciences, Lajas, PR, United States, William J Hernandez, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez, Electrical and Computer Engineering, United States and Ross Cunning, Shedd Aquarium, Coral Research Biologist, Chicago, United States
NeMO-Net – The Neural Multi-Modal Observation & Training Network for Global Coral Reef Assessment (653082)
Ved Chirayath1, Alan Sheng Xi Li1, Juan Luis Torres-Perez2, Michal Segal-Rosenhaimer3, Sam Purkis4 and Jarrett van den Bergh1, (1)NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States, (2)NASA Ames Research Center, Earth Science Division, Moffett Field, CA, United States, (3)NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, United States, (4)University of Miami, Department of Marine Geosciences, Miami, United States
CEOS Ocean Variable Enabling Research & Applications for GEO (COVERAGE): Implementation of a Prototype Big Data Platform Providing Enhanced Access to Inter-agency Satellite Data Products in Support of MBON (655449)
Vardis M Tsontos, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States, Eric J Lindstrom, NASA Headquarters, Washington D.C., United States, Jorge Vazquez, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, United States, Thomas Huang, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States and Mike Chin, JPL, Pasadena, CA, United States
Remotely Sensing Phytoplankton Size Structure in the Red Sea (638026)
John Anthony Gittings Sr1, Robert J W Brewin2,3, Dionysios E Raitsos4,5, Malika Kheireddine6, Mustapha Ouhssain1, Burton H Jones1 and Ibrahim Hoteit7, (1)King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, (2)University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom, (3)Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, (4)Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML), Plymouth, United Kingdom, (5)National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece, (6)KAUST- King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Red Sea Research Center, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, (7)King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Division of Physical Science and Engineering, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
Anticipating Illegal Maritime Activities from Anomalous Multiscale Fleet Behaviors Measured from Space (640874)
James Roger Watson, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States and John Woodil, Oregon State University, CEOAS, Corvallis, United States