OB42A:
Effect of Warming on Biological, Ecological, and Biogeochemical Ocean Processes: Responses from Organismal to Ecosystem Scales II

Session ID#: 93124

Session Description:
Global warming is one of the greatest threats to humankind and it has been suggested that marine organisms are more vulnerable to warming than terrestrial organisms. Understanding how enzymatic, genetic and physiological characteristics of individual organisms change in response to increasing mean temperature and temperature fluctuations and how these individual responses scale up to the community, ecosystem and eventually global biogeochemical cycles is a challenging scientific task. Important knowledge gaps exist at all these different scales. At the molecular level, for example, how are the activity and three-dimensional structure of key enzymes such as RubisCO affected by temperature? At the individual level, what are the general patterns of thermal reaction norms and how do they differ between species and habitats? How do species composition, coexistence, and diversity change as temperature changes, particularly with increasing temperature variability? Will these ecological responses translate into changes in biochemical fluxes like global photosynthesis, metabolism and carbon export, which will in turn cause feedbacks to Earth’s climate?  This session welcomes empirical and modelling studies at all these different scales and will act as a platform to comprehensively understand warming effects from organismal physiology to ecosystem processes in a dynamic and changing ocean.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Index Terms:

4813 Ecological prediction [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Susanne Menden-Deuer, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, United States
Co-chairs:  Gabriel Yvon-Durocher, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom, Hongbin Liu, HKUST, Kowloon, Hong Kong and Bingzhang Chen, University of Strathclyde, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  Bingzhang Chen, University of Strathclyde, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Moderators:  Susanne Menden-Deuer, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, United States and Bingzhang Chen, University of Strathclyde, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Susanne Menden-Deuer, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Numerical and functional responses of the mixotrophic dinoflagellate Alexandrium pohangense to various water temperatures and irradiances (649209)
Hae Jin Jeong, Jin Hee Ok and Ji Hyun You, Seoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul, South Korea
Intraspecific Variability in Thermal Tolerance Buffers Southern Ocean Diatoms from Biogeographic Range Contraction in a Warming Ocean (651401)
Ian Bishop1, Stephanie Anderson1, Sinead Collins2 and Tatiana A Rynearson1, (1)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Diverse herbivorous protists show common response in growth-temperature dependency (643084)
Gayantonia Franzè, Institute of Marine Research Bergen, Plankton Lab, Flødevigen, Norway and Susanne Menden-Deuer, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Turning up the Heat – Implications of Rising Temperatures for Arctic Zooplankton (653612)
Patricia Kaiser, BreMarE Bremen Marine Ecology, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, Wilhelm Hagen, BreMarE Bremen Marine Ecology, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, Germany and Holger Auel Sr., BreMarE Bremen Marine Ecology, University of Bremen, Germany
Effects of warming on the ecology and physiology of the Southern Ocean pteropod, Limacina helicina antarctica (654734)
Patricia S Thibodeau1,2, Deborah K Steinberg2 and Amy E Maas3, (1)University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (3)Arizona State University, Tempe, United States
Measuring Realized Resilience: Transforming Large Area Imagery into Coral Demographic Models in the Face of Disturbance (657773)
Thomas Oliver, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division, Honolulu, HI, United States, Courtney Couch, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Honolulu, HI, United States, Caroline Rodriguez, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Stuart A Sandin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Joshua Madine, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, United States
What Controls Microzooplankton Biomass and Herbivory Across Marginal Seas of China? (657572)
Hongbin Liu, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Kailin LIU, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Life science, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Bingzhang Chen, University of Strathclyde, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Glasgow, United Kingdom, Bangqin Huang, Xiamen University, State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen, China, Liping Zheng, Institute of Deep-sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Sanya, China and Suhong Su, Marine Environment Monitoring and forecasting Centre, Zhangzhou, China
Climate and fishing drive regime shifts in consumer‐mediated nutrient cycling in kelp forests (655295)
Joey Peters, University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, United States, Daniel Reed, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Deron E Burkepile, University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States