OB23B:
Quantifying Carbon Export Pathways in the Global Ocean III Panel

Session ID#: 93177

Session Description:
The ocean's biological pump connects the surface ocean, where light-driven photosynthetic processes fix dissolved carbon dioxide, to the ocean’s twilight zone, where exported carbon is consumed and transformed by a myriad of biological and physical processes as it transits to depth. Three basic pathways are thought to control organic carbon export in the open ocean - gravitational sinking, active migration by metazoans and physical advection and mixing - which are driven by a complicated combination of ecological, biogeochemical and physical oceanographic processes. Developing a predictive understanding of these export pathways and their attenuation with depth is critical for diagnosing present and future rates of ocean carbon sequestration. Recent advances in genomics, in situ particle imaging, remote sensing, geochemistry, autonomous sampling tools, along with recent investments in comprehensive interdisciplinary field programs like EXPORTS, COMICS, GOCART, CUSTARD, and WHOI’s Ocean Twilight Zone makes achieving this goal possible. This session will highlight research that couples ecological, biogeochemical, and physical observations and modeling aimed at improving our understanding and quantification of the ocean’s biological carbon pump.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CT - Chemical Tracers, Organic Matter and Trace Elements
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, Ivona Cetinic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  David Siegel, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States and Stephanie Henson, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

The seasonal progression of rates of productivity and export from the North Pacific NASA EXPORTS field study as observed by autonomous assets (647056)
David P Nicholson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Eric A D'Asaro, Applied Physics Lab, Univ of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Andrea J Fassbender, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, United States, Craig Lee, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Mary Jane Perry, University of Maine, Orono, ME, United States and Andrew F Thompson, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States
A 3-D Model of Lagrangian Marine Particles (645201)
Anna Rufas Blanco1, Tinna Jokulsdottir2, Dave May1, Sean Barrett3 and Samar Khatiwala1, (1)University of Oxford, Department of Earth Sciences, Oxford, United Kingdom, (2)University of Georgia, Department of Marine Sciences, GA, United States, (3)University of Oxford, Department of Physics, United Kingdom
What can we learn about carbon export from optically determined mesopelagic particle abundance? (647724)
Alexander Bochdansky, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States, Robert B Dunbar, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, Dennis A Hansell, University of Miami, Miami, United States and Gerhard J Herndl, Division of Bio-Oceanography, Center of Functional Ecology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090, Vienna, Austria
Quantifying Global and Regional Carbon Export and Sequestration Pathways with a Data Assimilation Model of the Biological Pump (644303)
Michael Edward Nowicki, University of California, Santa Barbara, Earth Research Institute and Department of Geography, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, Timothy J DeVries, University of California, Santa Barabara, Earth Research Institute and Department of Geography, Santa Barabara, United States and David Siegel, Univ of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
The Biological Carbon Pump seen through the “eyes” of multiple high resolution underwater gliders (654364)
Filipa Carvalho1, Stephanie Henson1, Nathan Briggs2 and Sandy Thomalla3, (1)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)National Oceanography Center, Southampton, United Kingdom, (3)CSIR, South Africa
Mechanisms Driving Enhanced Particle Export During a Submesoscale Re-stratification Event: Insights from Theory and Large Eddy Simulations (651280)
John Ryan Taylor1, Katherine Smith2 and Catherine Ann Vreugdenhil2, (1)University of Cambridge, DAMTP, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Diagnosing export pathways in the biological pump: Sediment trap data from the EXPORTS North Pacific field campaign (647488)
Margaret L Estapa, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, Colleen A Durkin, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States and Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States
A Decade of Net Community Production in the North Pacific from Biogeochemical Profiling Floats (647096)
Andrea J Fassbender1, William Haskell2, Jacqueline Long3, Josh N Plant1, Kenneth S Johnson1, Sophia Johannessen4 and Stephen Riser5, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, United States, (4)Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Sidney, BC, Canada, (5)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States