OB33C:
The Role of Plankton Physiology and Ecology for Ocean Biogeochemistry I eLightning

Session ID#: 93193

Session Description:
Global biogeochemical cycling determines the ocean's role in the climate system. Patterns of nutrient and oxygen distributions and carbon uptake are shaped by primary production, the subsequent export of organic matter to the deep ocean, remineralization of carbon and nutrients along the way and circulation on long time scales.

On short time scales, however, physiological and ecological processes are what actually drive the carbon uptake and the subsequent remineralization. Alterations in, e.g., competition, adaptation, and evolution may change community and food web structure and thereby affect ecosystem functions like resource use efficiency or nitrogen fixation.

We ask to what degree and in which regions do changes at the ecological and physiological level influence biogeochemical cycling and the ocean's role as a carbon sink on timescales from seasonal, interannual, centennial (e.g. future climate change) to millennial (i.e. past climate changes)?

We welcome both observational and modelling studies from local to global scales with a quantitative focus. In particular, we encourage studies featuring detailed ecological and/or physiological processes that directly link to the large-scale ocean biogeochemistry on one or more timescales.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Index Terms:

1615 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1635 Oceans [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Friederike Prowe, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Co-chairs:  Judith Hauck, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Marine Biogeoscoences, Bremerhaven, Germany and Stephanie Dutkiewicz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Friederike Prowe, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Moderators:  Friederike Prowe, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany and Judith Hauck, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Marine Biogeoscoences, Bremerhaven, Germany
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Friederike Prowe, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Influence of microbial and molecular diversity on the storage of marine dissolved organic matter: Insights from a modelling perspective (646008)
Sinikka Lennartz1, Andrea Mentges2, Bernd Blasius2, Curtis A. Deutsch3, David P Keller4, Andreas Oschlies4, Christoph Feenders2 and Thorsten Dittmar5, (1)University of Oldenburg, ICBM-MPI Bridging Group for Marine Geochemistry, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Oldenburg, Germany, (2)Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Oldenburg, Germany, (3)University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, United States, (4)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (5)University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
 
Dissolved Organic Carbon Accumulation and Export Potential in the Western North Atlantic (648285)
Nicholas Baetge1, Jason Graff2, Michael Behrenfeld2 and Craig A Carlson1, (1)University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute/Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (2)Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
 
Phospholipid turnover rates suggest that bacterial growth rates in the open ocean are systematically underestimated (655933)
Kimberly J. Popendorf, University of Miami, Ocean Sciences, Miami, FL, United States, Michal Koblížek, Institute of Microbiology, Czech Republic and Benjamin AS Van Mooy, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Tracking single cells undergoing vertical migrations: Connecting Cell Biology to Ocean Ecology (657857)
Manu Prakash1, Deepak Krishnamurthy1, Delphine Mion2, Adam G. Larson1, Hongquan Li1 and Ethan Li1, (1)Stanford University, Bioengineering, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)Polytechnique, France, France
 
Modeling photosynthesis and the exudation of DOM in the subtropical oceans (646484)
Zhen WU, Mick Follows and Stephanie Dutkiewicz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States
 
The biogeography of subsurface chlorophyll maxima in the Southern Ocean (648015)
Kimberlee Anne Baldry, University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Science, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Nicole A Hill, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, Peter G Strutton, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia and Philip W. Boyd, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Antarctic Climate Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Australia
 
Spatial variability of iron and light co-limitation in the Southern Ocean during the Austral summer. (637301)
Clara R Vives1,2, Christina Schallenberg2, Philip W. Boyd2, Joan Llort3,4 and Peter G Strutton1,2, (1)Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (3)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, Hobart, Australia, (4)Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Earth Sciences Department - Climate Prediction Group, Barcelona, Spain
 
Assessment of phytoplankton community composition and cobalamin nutritional status using protein abundance measurements on the Scotian Shelf and Slope (653425)
Erin Marie Bertrand1, Elden Rowland1, Tor Kitching1, Emmanuel Devred2 and Julie LaRoche1, (1)Dalhousie University, Department of Biology, Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada
 
Biogeochemical Implications Of Diel Changes In Migratory Copepod Physiology (643460)
Amy E Maas, Arizona State University, Tempe, United States, Leocadio Blanco-Bercial, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda, Nora McNamara-Bordewick, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, United States, Brook L Nunn, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States, Emma Timmins-Schiffman, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States and Ann M Tarrant, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
A trait-based approach to describe the elemental stoichiometry ofmarine phytoplankton and the regulation of the biological pump (658185)
George Hagstrom1, Simon Levin1, Catherine Garcia2, Gregory L. Britten3, Francois Primeau2, Weilei Wang4 and Adam Martiny2, (1)Princeton University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton, NJ, United States, (2)University of California Irvine, Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States, (3)Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, (4)University of California, Irvine, Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States