AI44C:
Processes Affecting Air-Sea Exchange and the Biogeochemistry of the Upper Ocean III Posters

Session ID#: 93307

Session Description:
Gas, aerosol, and heat exchange processes across the air-sea interface impact global biogeochemical cycles, marine ecosystem dynamics, and atmospheric chemistry. Understanding these exchange processes is therefore critical for the prediction of climate change. Atmospheric deposition of micro- and macro-nutrients, organic matter, and pollutants influence biogeochemical cycling, primary productivity, and biological community composition in the ocean. Emissions of gases and aerosol particles from the sea surface to the atmosphere affect the number and composition of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles with important consequences for understanding clouds and climate. Upper-ocean processes, including the sea surface microlayer and phytoplankton and microbial compositions, are both affected by and influence these exchange processes. The upper ocean with its high and variable incident radiation, turbulence, and physical, chemical, and biological horizontal and vertical gradients must therefore be considered when estimating exchange rates of particles, heat and gases. 

Over the past decade, major field campaigns in chronically under-observed regions, breakthroughs in autonomous platforms and sensors, and innovations in numerical modeling and data analysis techniques have significantly advanced our understanding of the processes and rates of air-sea gas exchange, particularly for carbon dioxide. These advances are helping to improve regional and global model estimates of carbon budgets, and therefore, baseline information for the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. This session invites theoretical, experimental, observational and model studies as well as technological advances for the investigation of upper ocean biogeochemical influences on and consequences of air-sea exchange processes.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CT - Chemical Tracers, Organic Matter and Trace Elements
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4504 Air/sea interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4801 Aerosols [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Andrew S Wozniak, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States
Co-chairs:  Mariana Ribas Ribas, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, Alison R Gray, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Jaime B Palter, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
Primary Liaison:  Andrew S Wozniak, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States
Moderators:  Mariana Ribas Ribas, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany and Alison R Gray, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Jaime B Palter, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
A new estimate of the wintertime Southern Ocean CO2 flux from subsurface summer observations (641438)
Ute Schuster, Neill Mackay and Andrew J. Watson, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
 
Interannual and seasonal surface water pCO2 in a marsh-dominated estuary (650978)
David P Gillikin, Union College, Geology, Schenectady, NY, United States, Heidi O'Hora, University of Michigan, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, David Hays Goodwin, Denison University, Geosciences, Granville, OH, United States and Alan D Wanamaker, Iowa State University, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Ames, United States
 
Protocol for the Assessment and Correction of Moored Surface Water and Air pCO2 Measurements from the Ocean Observatories Initiative Endurance Array (652435)
Christopher E Wingard, Edward Paul Dever, Jonathan P Fram and Craig M Risien, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States
 
Rain-induced changes in sea surface salinity and pCO2: Implications for global air-sea CO2 fluxes (656547)
David T Ho, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, Maxwell Kelley, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York City, NY, United States, Xavier Perrot, Ecole Normale Supérieure, France and Hugo Bellenger, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Paris, France
 
Carbonate system parameters during the propagation of Agulhas eddies through the South Atlantic Ocean: inferences from satellite data (646123)
Iole Orselli1, Felippe Galdino1, José Luiz Azevedo2, Rodrigo Kerr Sr.3 and Catherine Goyet4, (1)FURG, Rio Grande, Brazil, (2)Federal University of Rio Grande, Instituto de Oceanografia, Rio Grande, Brazil, (3)Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Oceanografia, Rio Grande, Brazil, (4)University of Perpignan Via Domitia, Perpignan, France
 
Distributions and Air-Sea Exchange of Methane and Nitrous Oxide in the Levantine Basin (652563)
Jeramy Dedrick1, Shari Ann Yvon-Lewis1, Yizhaq Makovsky2, Or M Bialik3 and Daniel Sher4, (1)Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States, (2)University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel, (3)University of Haifa, Dr. Moses Strauss Department of Marine Geosciences, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel, (4)University of Haifa, Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, Haifa, Israel
 
Effects of air-sea exchange of reactive gases on global atmospheric chemistry system (644560)
Takashi Sekiya1, Maki Noguchi Aita2, Akitomo Yamamoto3, Fumikazu Taketani1, Yoko Iwamoto4, Katsuhiro Kawamoto5, Kengo Sudo6,7 and Yugo Kanaya7, (1)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Kanagawa, Japan, (2)Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Yokohama, Japan, (3)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Center for Environmental Modeling and Application, Yokohama, Japan, (4)Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Integrated Sciences for Life, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan, (5)Kobe University, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Japan, (6)Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan, (7)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan
 
Leveraging Modern Oceanic Sampling Technologies to Improve Climate Models (654076)
Kevin Rea1, Michael Paul Meredith2, Matthew R Mazloff3, Simon H Bittleston4, David Walker1 and Joe Rizzi1, (1)Jupiter Research Foundation, Los Altos, CA, United States, (2)NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom
 
VOC Emissions From a Mesocosm Bloom Experiment: Untangling Abiotic and Biotic Processes (655303)
Duyen Dang1, Michael Rui Clemente Alves1, David Gonzales1, Sarah Amiri2, Kimberly A Prather3 and Vicki H Grassian4, (1)University of California San Diego, Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)University of California San Diego, Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, United States
 
Predicted and Observed Differences in Organic Functional Group Composition in Marine Aerosols from Three Oceans (643307)
Lynn M Russell1, Savannah Lewis1, Georges Saliba2, Robin L. Modini3, Luke T Cravigan4, Zoran Ristovski5, Patricia Quinn6, Timothy S Bates7 and Amanda A Frossard8, (1)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Carnegie Mellon University, Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, (3)EPFL Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, (4)Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (5)Queensland University of Technology, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (6)Atmospheric Chemistry Group & TPOS 2020 project, University of Washington/JISAO & NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, WA 98115, Seattle, WA, United States, (7)NOAA PMEL, Seattle, United States, (8)University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States
 
Extraction and characterization of surfactants in coastal seawater and atmospheric aerosol particles from Skidaway Island, GA (646063)
Tret Burdette1, Rachel Bramblett1, Dennis Phillips1, Kathryn Zimmermann2 and Amanda A Frossard3, (1)University of Georgia, Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States, (2)Georgia Gwinnett College, Chemistry, Lawrenceville, GA, United States, (3)University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States
 
Understanding the Role of Marine Surface Active Compounds in the Microphysical Properties of Primary Marine Aerosol (646056)
Rachel Bramblett1, Tret Burdette1 and Amanda A Frossard2, (1)University of Georgia, Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States, (2)University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, Athens, GA, United States
 
Speciation of Iron in Aerosol Particles Entering the Irish Shelf at Mace Head measured by µXAS and cathodic-stripping voltammetry (641667)
Sarah L Nicholas, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, United States, Darius Ceburnis, National University of Ireland, School of Physics, Galway, Ireland, Maija Iris Heller, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Chile, Escuela de Ciencias del Mar, Valparaiso, Chile, Matthew A Marcus, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, United States, Geraldine Sarthou, IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, LEMAR, CNRS, Plouzané, France and Peter L Croot, iCRAG (Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences), Earth and Ocean Sciences, School of Natural Sciences and the Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland
 
Aerosol trace element concentrations and fractional solubility in the North Pacific Ocean: US GEOTRACES GP-15 Pacific Meridional Transect (654154)
Clifton S Buck, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA, United States, Chris Marsay, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, United States and William M Landing, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States
 
Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to the Eastern Indian Ocean during Boreal Autumn (643026)
Yoko Iwamoto1, Katsuhiro Kawamoto2, Fumikazu Taketani3, Yugo Kanaya4, Takashi Sekiya3, Maki Noguchi Aita5 and Kazuyo Yamaji6, (1)Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Integrated Sciences for Life, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan, (2)Kobe University, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Japan, (3)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Kanagawa, Japan, (4)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan, (5)Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Yokohama, Japan, (6)KOBE UNIVERSITY, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe, Japan
 
Potentials of Deposition of Atmospheric Inorganic Nitrogen Compounds to the Surface Marine Ecosystem at Sea of Japan (643162)
Fumikazu Taketani1, Maki Noguchi Aita2, Kazuyo Yamaji3, Takashi Sekiya1, Kohei Ikeda4, Kosei Sasaoka5, Makio C Honda6, Kazuhiko Matsumoto7 and Yugo Kanaya8, (1)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Kanagawa, Japan, (2)Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Yokohama, Japan, (3)KOBE UNIVERSITY, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe, Japan, (4)NIES National Institute of Environmental Studies, Ibaraki, Japan, (5)JAMSTEC, Yokosuka, Japan, (6)JAMSTEC, Kanagawa, Japan, (7)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Kanagawa, Japan, (8)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan
 
Aerosol organic matter composition during the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (GP-15) (654660)
Andrew S Wozniak1, Jessica Irene Czarnecki1, Alina M Ebling2, Nicole R R Coffey1 and Cliff Buck3, (1)University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States, (2)University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Lewes, DE, United States, (3)University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States
 
Field Evidences for the Positive Effects of Atmospheric Deposition on Primary Productivity in the Oligotrophic Ocean (644684)
Kazuhiko Matsumoto1, Fumikazu Taketani2, Kazuyo Yamaji3, Yoko Iwamoto4 and Makio C Honda1, (1)JAMSTEC, Kanagawa, Japan, (2)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Kanagawa, Japan, (3)KOBE UNIVERSITY, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe, Japan, (4)Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Integrated Sciences for Life, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan