AI21A:
Tropical Cyclone-Ocean Interactions: From Weather to Climate I

Session ID#: 93455

Session Description:
Tropical Cyclone (TC)-ocean interactions are critical for TC intensity change because the ocean is the energy source for TCs. Air-sea interaction processes involve energy and momentum exchange between TCs and the ocean and are important on both TC (i.e., short-term) and climate (i.e., long-term) timescales. On shorter timescales, TC-ocean interactions are important for intensity forecasting. The intense winds of TCs significantly impact sea surface temperature (SST) through entrainment mixing and upwelling. The sea state, including waves and spray, also depends on wind speed and affects air-sea enthalpy and momentum exchange. There are many open questions regarding the impact of TCs on ocean biogeochemistry and biological productivity. On longer climate timescales, how the future ocean will evolve has strong implications for TC activity projections, with important societal implications. Meanwhile, natural inter-annual (e.g., ENSO) and inter-decadal (e.g., the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation) variability and global warming also affect the ocean, TCs, and their interactions. This session welcomes submissions under the broad subject of TC-ocean physical and biogeochemical interactions from weather to climate timescales. It intends to provide a friendly platform for interactions among oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, and climatologists in this multi-disciplinary field.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
Index Terms:

1610 Atmosphere [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4504 Air/sea interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4572 Upper ocean and mixed layer processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Karthik Balaguru, PNNL, Marine Sciences Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
Co-chairs:  Gregory R Foltz, NOAA/AOML, Miami, United States, I-I Lin, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan and Chunzai Wang, State Key Laboratory of Tropical Oceanography, SCSIO, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
Primary Liaison:  Gregory R Foltz, NOAA/AOML, Miami, United States
Moderators:  Gregory R Foltz, NOAA/AOML, Miami, United States and Karthik Balaguru, PNNL, Marine Sciences Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  I-I Lin, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Arrested development of a tropical cyclone: Measurements from a profiling float array (637067)
Shaun Johnston1, Daniel L Rudnick1, Jim Moum2 and Noel Brizuela3, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Oregon State Univ, Corvallis, OR, United States, (3)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Evaluating the Ocean Response to Hurricanes Irma and Florence in the ECMWF Model (653890)
Elizabeth Sanabia1, Kristian Mogensen2, Steven R Jayne3, Linus Magnusson2, Casey Densmore4, Grace Rovira-Melendez1 and Suwen Jordan Sun1, (1)US Naval Academy, Department of Oceanography, Annapolis, MD, United States, (2)European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom, (3)WHOI, Department of Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)WHOI, Department of Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole, United States
OBSERVED OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTIONS DURING TROPICAL CYCLONE MICHAEL'S RAPID INTENSITY CHANGES (647734)
Lynn K Shay1, Benjamin Jaimes de la Cruz1, Joshua Wadler2, Luca Raffaele Centurioni3, Jun Zhang4, Jodi Brewster1 and Luna Hiron1, (1)RSMAS/University of Miami, Department of Ocean Sciences, Miami, FL, United States, (2)University of Miami, Cooperative Institute Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Hurricane Research Division, Miami, FL, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, FL, United States
AGU Centennial Monograph – ENSO in a Changing Climate: ENSO and Tropical Cyclones (645269)
I-I Lin, National Taiwan University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan, Suzana Camargo, Columbia University, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, Christina M Patricola, Iowa State University, Geological & Atmospheric Sciences, Ames, United States, Julien Boucharel, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Meteorology, Honolulu, HI, United States, Savin Chand, Federation University, ACT, Australia, Philip Klotzbach, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States, Johnny Chung Leung Chan, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Bin Wang, Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, United States, Ping Chang, Texas A & M Univ, Oceanography, College Station, United States, Tim Li, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States and Fei-Fei Jin, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, United States
Ocean precursors to the extreme Atlantic 2017 hurricane season (641542)
Samantha Hallam1,2, Robert Marsh3, Simon A Josey2, Patrick Hyder4 and Joel Hirschi2, (1)University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (3)University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton, United Kingdom, (4)UK Met Office, United Kingdom
Impact of ocean conditions on hurricane development and forecast: examples of Hurricanes Maria (2017) and Michael (2018) (654327)
Matthieu Le Henaff, University of Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Miami, FL, United States, Ricardo M. Domingues, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, Gustavo Jorge Goni, NOAA/AOML, Miami, FL, United States, George R Halliwell Jr, NOAA Miami, Miami, FL, United States, Francis Bringas, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL, United States, Hyun-Sook Kim, Atlantic Oceanic and Meteorologic Laborabory, Miami, United States, Jili Dong, National Centers For Environmental Prediction-Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, MD, United States, Avichal Mehra, National Centers For Environmental Prediction-Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, United States and Vijay Tallapragada, NOAA/NCEP/EMC, College Park, MD, United States
Wave Coupling Sensitivity Investigations with a Coupled Hurricane-Ocean Model (652273)
Hyun-Sook Kim, IMSG at EMC/NCEP/NOAA, College Park, MD, United States, Jessica Meixner, Organization Not Listed, College Park, United States, Bin Liu, National Centers For Environmental Prediction-Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, MD, United States, Alan J Wallcraft, Florida State University, Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Avichal Mehra, National Centers For Environmental Prediction-Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, United States and Vijay Tallapragada, NOAA/NCEP/EMC, College Park, MD, United States
Scientific Results from the 2018 & 2019 North Atlantic Hurricane Glider Picket Lines (656721)
Scott M Glenn1, Travis N Miles1, Maria Fernanda Aristizabal2, Cliff Watkins2 and Hak Soo Lim3, (1)Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, (2)Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, (3)KIOST Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Korea, Republic of (South)
Hurricane-Induced Marine Nutrient and Carbon Responses in the Upper Ocean (656637)
Laura Celeste McGee, North Carolina State University Raleigh, Raleigh, NC, United States and Ruoying He, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC, United States
Ocean observations under Hurricanes Irma (2017) and Florence (2018): Evolution of the response across the storm wakes (651811)
Steven R Jayne, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Elizabeth Sanabia, US Naval Academy, Department of Oceanography, Annapolis, MD, United States