PC006:
Nano- and Micro-scale Chemical Signatures in the Ocean: Small Signals from Climate and Microbes with a Big Impact


Session ID#: 28502

Session Description:
Recent advances in micro and nano analytical techniques have opened new windows to a rich set of chemical information about the ocean. Whether reconstructing the pace of the ice ages, how the carbon cycle has changed with time, or the flow of metabolites between marine microbes, much of what we are learning about the ocean is based on tiny chemical signatures. Recorded as trace element anomalies, isotopic shifts, 13C and 14N labels, or biomarkers, these chemical signatures reflect how mass and energy move through systems across a range of scales. Some of the new tools that are providing access to small-scale signals include NanoSIMS (as applied to both enriched isotope and trace element experiments), atom probe tomography, laser ablation, near-field IR and Raman mapping approaches, new synchrotorn-based techniques, and ultra high-resolution mass spectrometry. We welcome contributions from researchers applying established nano- or micro-analytical techniques to marine systems, especially correlative imaging methods, as well as scientists developing new approaches. Sharing recent developments across these tools can inspire new applications and help us solve common challenges related to scaling and interpreting these rich data.
Primary Chair:  Alexander C Gagnon, University of Washington Seattle Campus, Seattle, WA, United States
Co-chairs:  Howard J Spero, University of California Davis, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Davis, CA, United States and Anne E Dekas, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
Index Terms:

4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
4924 Geochemical tracers [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]
Cross-Topics:
  • CT - Chemical Tracers, Organic Matter and Trace Materials
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • MG - Marine Geology and Sedimentology

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Howard J Spero1, Charlotte LeKieffre2, Ann D Russell1, Jennifer S Fehrenbacher3, Emmanuelle Geslin4 and Anders Meibom5, (1)University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States, (2)Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Lausanne, Switzerland, Lausanne, Switzerland, (3)Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (4)Université d’Angers, France, France, (5)EPFL Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Anders Meibom, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Sylvain Bernard, MNHN National Museum of Natural History Paris, IMPMC, Paris, France, Damien Daval, LHyGeS Laboratoire d'Hydrologie et de Géochimie de Strasbourg, Strasbourg Cedex, France, Philippe Ackerer, LHyGeS-UMR7517, EOST, INSU/CNRS, Strasbourg, France, Sylvain Pont, Muséum National d´Histoire Naturelle, Laboratoire de Minéralogie et Cosmochimie du Muséum, Paris, France and Anders Meibom, EPFL Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Elisa A Bonnin, University of Washington Seattle Campus, Seattle, WA, United States, Howard J Spero, University California Davis, Davis, CA, United States and Alexander C Gagnon, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States
Yuji Sano1, Yui Amamiya2, Naoko Sugihara2, Kentaro Tanaka2, Tomihiko Higuchi2, Naoto Takahata2 and Kotaro Shirai2, (1)Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan, (2)University of Tokyo, AORI, Kashiwa, Japan
Jess F Adkins1, Sang Chen1 and Alexander C Gagnon2, (1)California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States, (2)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States
Alexander C Gagnon1, Elisa A Bonnin1, Brian Hopkinson2 and Ann D Russell3, (1)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States, (3)University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States
Jennifer S Fehrenbacher1, Ann D Russell2, Catherine V Davis3, Howard J Spero4 and Edward Chu1, (1)University of California Davis, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Davis, CA, United States, (2)University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States, (3)University of South Carolina Columbia, School of the Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Columbia, SC, United States, (4)University California Davis, Davis, CA, United States